Sunday, 31 March 2013

Bibliography of the Works of W. Somerset Maugham




Prefatory Notes

Two things should be noted immediately. Firstly, the number of Maugham's novels (A. 1.) is 20 if you consider Up at the Villa (1940) a novel, although it can well be viewed as a novella, or even as a longish short story. Indeed, it fits best Maugham’s own description of short story. Secondly, the books with essays (A. 4.) are nine because Great Novelists and Their Novels (1948) is actually an early version of Ten Novels and Their Authors (1954). Since Up at the Villa has (in my opinion, not that of the critics, nor even that of many readers) principal characters as vividly compelling as in any novel, and Ten Novels and Their Authors is an expanded later version of Great Novelists and Their Novels but not significantly different from it, I think the correct numbers are 20 novels and nine volumes with essays. This makes for 41 books overall (section A), not 78 as often stated by people who don’t read their Stott carefully – or, more probably, have never heard of him. Since Maugham’s plays are very important contribution to his literary output, but it is hardly acceptable to count them as separate books, one is apt to round the number of books to 44 including the three volumes of The Collected Plays although they contain only 18 plays (of 26 published, not counting several completely written that remained unpublished).

It should also be noted that Somerset Maugham’s contribution to periodicals or books of others (prefaces, introductions and the like) is significant. A solid proof about that is the invaluable for every real admirer of the great writer book A Traveller in Romance (1984). In this volume, John Whitehead collected and introduced 65 pieces spanning 63 years of Maugham’s life which had not been published in any of his books until then: magazine articles, prefaces and introductions to books by others, curtain-raisers, even a few short stories.

Speaking of posthumously published books and short stories, Seventeen Lost Stories (1969) must be mentioned. Compiled and introduced by Craig Showalter, in addition to the six short stories that comprised Maugham’s first collection, Orientations (1899), and were never reprinted later during his life, it contains 11 stories more that were published in various magazines until 1908 but had never appeared in book form until 1969. All in all, the total number of Maugham's short stories swells to 109, if we consider “A Marriage of Convenience”, “Cousin Amy/The Luncheon” and “The Happy Couple” as three stories, although each of them exists in two rather different versions: early one included in Seventeen Lost Stories and significantly rewritten later one included in The Complete Short Stories (1951).

As far as I am aware, there are only two other Maugham’s stories that exist in two versions: “The Mother” and “A Man from Glasgow”. In these cases, however, the differences between the early and the late versions are very minor and both may justly be considered as one story. Both later versions were included in Creatures of Circumstance (1947). “The Mother” was first published in Storyteller Magazine in April 1909. “A Man from Glasgow appeared in The Woman at Home for February 1905. Interestingly enough, both earlier versions have been published in book form as well; they can be found in The Cassell Miscellany (1958, ed. Fred Urquhart) and The Ash-Tree Press Annual Macabre, 1998 (ed. Jack Adrian), respectively.

It is also worth noting that seven pieces from The Complete Short Stories (1951) were originally published in book form, not in a short story collection, but in Maugham’s two mature travel books, On a Chinese Screen (1922) and The Gentleman in the Parlour (1930). These are “The Taipan”, “The Consul”; “Mabel”, “Masterson”, “Princess September”, “A Marriage of Convenience” (late version) and “Mirage”. The first two appeared in On a Chinese Screen under these titles. The last five appeared in The Gentleman in the Parlour as chapters VI, X, XXXII, XXXIV and XLIII, respectively. Keep in mind that many of these “travel stories” were also published in periodicals, often prior to their first appearance in book form and under different titles.

The aforementioned 109 pieces are distributed as follows:

  • The Complete Short Stories (1951) – 91 short stories (84 pieces from all collections but Orientations plus 7 pieces from the travel books);
  • Seventeen Lost Stories (1969) – 14 short stories, excluding the three aforementioned “dual” ones;
  • A Traveller in Romance (1984) – 4 short stories.

Or in purely mathematical form: 91 + 14 + 4 = 109

Recently, and amazingly, three new short stories, never collected in book form so far, have been discovered:

·        ''A Really Nice Story: A Short Tale'', Black & White, Nov. 30, 1901, pp. 768-769;
·        ''The Image of the Virgin: A Short Story'', Black & White, Dec. 14, 1901, pp. 840-842;
·        ''The Criminal'', Lloyd's Weekly News, July 31, 1904, p. 14.

Two further notes on the short stories.

Firstly, almost all of them were first published in magazines and often underwent a certain amount of revision before their first appearance in book form. For my own part, I am completely satisfied with Maugham’s final versions in his books and therefore I am inclined to exclude from this bibliography all magazine short stories (or any other pieces, for that matter) that appeared in book form later, during Maugham's life or afterwards.

Secondly, the listing of the numerous volumes with random selections of Maugham's short stories published through the years most certainly is beyond the scope of the present bibliography. Moreover, it is quite pointless since all these contain material that can be found word for word in earlier editions.

For further details on Maugham’s short stories, see A Bibliography of the Short Fiction.

For the very same reason, all more or less identical editions of any book by Maugham have been omitted except the following:
·      first English and American editions;
·      later editions with new preface or any other changes by Maugham himself or any other writer of some importance;
·      at least one modern paperback edition (usually the Vintage Classics' handsome one) that is currently in print or has not long since been out of print and can still be obtained easily.

In addition, two pamphlets must be mentioned, namely Of Human Bondage, with a Digression on the Art of Fiction: An address (1946) and The Writer's Point of View (1951). The former is an address given by Maugham on 20th of April 1946 in Coolidge Auditorium, The Library of Congress, on the occasion of his presenting the original manuscript of Of Human Bondage to the Library of Congress; and the latter is actually the Ninth Annual Lecture of National Book League given by Maugham in Kingsway Hall on 24th of October 1951. Despite many repetitions with his other non-fiction works – Maugham constantly repeated himself and very often confessed it openly – these pamphlets contain some interesting points that are not to be found in any other of his writings.

Several of his short stories also appeared separately as pamphlets – The Judgement Seat (1934), Princess September and The Nightingale (1939, more of a fairy tale actually, later retitled “Princess September” in The Complete Short Stories) and The Unconquered (1944), for instance – but they have all appeared in book form as well. So has the little article My South Sea Island (1936), in A Traveller in Romance (1984); and so have all ten stories from the books Quartet (1948), Trio (1950) and Encore (1952): these also contain screenplays based upon them but Maugham apparently took little part in their writing. Although these three books do also contain a few introductions that Maugham spoke on the screen in the three movies with the same names, they are too short for the books to be included in a bibliography that aims at completeness but tries to minimize repetitions. All aforementioned pamphlets but the two in the previous paragraph should also be omitted in such an endeavour.

Finally, Maugham's activity as a reader, rather than as a writer, should be mentioned. He himself compiled no fewer than four anthologies of fiction and non-fiction. They all contain absorbing original introductions (in two of the cases he added extensive notes as well) and certainly should be listed in a bibliography. It is worth noting that Maugham himself also wrote a number of fascinating prefaces, with a great deal of important bibliographical and biographical information despite some repetitions, for later editions of his own works, most notably Heinemann’s great series known as The Collected Edition and published between 1934 and 1969.

Enough prefatory notes for now.

=====ABRIDGED VERSION=====

A. BOOKS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
A. 1. NOVELS
A. 1. 1. Liza of Lambeth, 1897
A. 1. 2. The Making of a Saint, 1898
A. 1. 3. The Hero, 1901
A. 1. 4. Mrs. Craddock, 1902
A. 1. 5. The Merry-Go-Round, 1904
A. 1. 6. The Bishop's Apron, 1906
A. 1. 7. The Explorer, 1907
A. 1. 8. The Magician, 1908
A. 1. 9. Of Human Bondage, 1915
A. 1. 10. The Moon and Sixpence, 1919
A. 1. 11. The Painted Veil, 1925
A. 1. 12. Cakes and Ale, 1930
A. 1. 13. The Narrow Corner, 1932
A. 1. 14. Theatre, 1937
A. 1. 15. Christmas Holiday, 1939
A. 1. 16. Up at the Villa, 1941
A. 1. 17. The Hour Before the Dawn, 1942
A. 1. 18. The Razor's Edge, 1944
A. 1. 19. Then and Now, 1946
A. 1. 20. Catalina, 1948

A. 2. SHORT STORY COLLECTIONS
A. 2. 1. Orientations, 1899
A. 2. 2. The Trembling of a Leaf, 1921
A. 2. 3. The Casuarina Tree, 1926
A. 2. 4. Ashenden, 1928
A. 2. 5. First Person Singular, 1931
A. 2. 6. Ah King, 1933
A. 2. 7. Cosmopolitans, 1936
A. 2. 8. The Mixture as Before, 1940
A. 2. 9. Creatures of Circumstance, 1947

A. 3. TRAVEL BOOKS
A. 3. 1. The Land of the Blessed Virgin, 1905
A. 3. 2. On a Chinese Screen, 1922
A. 3. 3. The Gentleman in the Parlour, 1930

A. 4. ESSAYS
A. 4. 1. Don Fernando, 1935
A. 4. 2. The Summing Up, 1938
A. 4. 3. France at War, 1940
A. 4. 4. Books and You, 1940
A. 4. 5. Strictly Personal, 1941
A. 4. 6. Great Novelists and Their Novels, 1948
A. 4. 6a. Ten Novels and Their Authors, 1954
A. 4. 7. A Writer's Notebook, 1948
A. 4. 8. The Vagrant Mood, 1952
A. 4. 9. Points of View, 1958

B. PLAYS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM (year of writing)
B. 1. Marriages are made in Heaven (1896-97)
B. 2. Mademoiselle Zampa (1896-97)
B. 3. A Man of Honour (1898/rev. 1902)
B. 4. The Explorer (1899)
B. 5. Loaves and Fishes (1902)
B. 6. Lady Frederick (1903)
B. 7. Mrs. Dot (1904)
B. 8. Jack Straw (1907)
B. 9. Penelope (1908)
B. 10. The Tenth Man (1909)
B. 11. Smith (1909)
B. 12. Landed Gentry (1910)
B. 13. The Land of Promise (1913)
B. 14. The Unattainable (1915)
B. 15. Our Betters (1915)
B. 16. Love in the Cottage (1917)
B. 17. Caesar's Wife (1918)
B. 18. Home and Beauty (1919)
B. 19. The Circle (1919)
B. 20. The Unknown (1920)
B. 21. East of Suez (1922)
B. 22. The Camel's Back (1923)
B. 23. The Road Uphill (1924)
B. 24. The Constant Wife (1926)
B. 25. The Letter (1927)
B. 26. The Sacred Flame (1928)
B. 27. The Bread-Winner (1930)
B. 28. For Services Rendered (1932)
B. 29. Sheppey (1932)

C. POSTHUMOUSLY PUBLISHED BOOKS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
C. 1. Seventeen Lost Stories, 1969
C. 2. A Traveller in Romance, 1984

D. PAMPHLETS AND CONTRIBUTIONS TO BOOKS BY OTHERS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
D. 1. My Favorite Story, 1928
D. 2. How Writers Write: Essays by Contemporary Authors
D. 3. The Harvest, MCMXXXVII
D. 4. Wisdom of Life: An Anthology of Noble Thoughts
D. 5. A Number of People by Sir Edward Marsh
D. 6. An Appeal for the Hospitals, 1941
D. 7. Modern English Readings, 1942
D. 8. The English Spirit, 1942
D. 9. The Magician by Frank Bruno, 1944
D. 10. Paul Gauguin by Raymond Cogniat, April 1946
D. 11. Of Human Bondage, with a Digression on the Art of Fiction: An address, 1946
D. 12. Writing for Love or Money by Norman Cousins, Ed.
D. 13. Essays by Divers Hands, MCML
D. 14. The Writer's Point of View, 1951
D. 15. Robert Ross: Friend of Friends by Margery Ross
D. 16. Speech by W. Somerset Maugham
D. 17. The Cassell Miscellany, 1958
D. 18. Purely for My Pleasure, 1962

E. CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICALS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
E. 0. 1. ''A Really Nice Story: A Short Tale'', 1901.
E. 0. 2. ''The Image of the Virgin: A Short Story'', 1901.
E. 0. 3. ''The Criminal'', 1904.
E. 1. The Mother, April 1909
E. 2. The Woman Who Wouldn't Take a Hint, April 1924
E. 3. Advice to a Young Author, 2 March 1927
E. 4. Through the Jungle, July and August 1929
E. 5. Maugham Discusses Drama, May 1931
E. 6. How I Write Short Stories, 28 July 1934
E. 7. W. Somerset Maugham discusses the Cinema, November 19, 1938
E. 8. The Professional Writer, 29 January 1938
E. 9. Give Me a Murder, 28 December 1940
E. 10. What Tomorrow Holds, January 1941
E. 11. They are Strange People, February 1941
E. 12. In Defence of Who-done-its, 25 May 1945
E. 13. Function of the Writer, 25 May 1946
E. 14. What Should a Novel Do?, 3 March 1947
E. 15. Ten Best Sellers, September 1948
E. 16. I'm Glad To Be Old, April 1951
E. 17. The Bidding Started Slowly, June 1952
E. 18. On the Approach of Middle Age, 15 November 1960
E. 19. Looking Back, June-August 1962
E. 20. The Wisdom of W. S. Maugham, January 1966

F. IMPORTANT COLLECTED EDITIONS OF WORKS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
F. 1. The Complete Short Stories, 1951, 3 vols.
F. 2. The Complete Short Stories, 1952, 2 vols.
F. 3. The Collected Plays, 1952, 3 vols.
F. 4. The Selected Novels, 1953, 3 vols.
F. 5. The Partial View, 1954
F. 6. The Travel Books, 1955
F. 7. Selected Prefaces and Introductions, 1963
F. 8. Collected Short Stories, 1963, 4 vols.
F. 9. The Maugham Reader, 1950
F. 10. Mr. Maugham Himself, 1954

G. THE COLLECTED EDITION OF W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
G. 1. Liza of Lambeth (1934, New Preface)
G. 2. Cakes and Ale (1934, New Preface)
G. 3. The Narrow Corner (1934, New Preface)
G. 4. The Painted Veil (1934, New Preface)
G. 5. Ashenden (1934, New Preface)
G. 6. On a Chinese Screen (1935, New Preface)
G. 7. The Gentleman in the Parlour (1935, New Preface)
G. 8. The Moon and Sixpence (1935, New Preface)
G. 9. The Trembling of a Leaf (1935, New Preface)
G. 10. The Casuarina Tree (1935, the original preface!)
G. 11. Ah King (1936, New Preface)
G. 12. First Person Singular (1936, New Preface)
G. 13. Of Human Bondage (1937)
G. 14. Mrs Craddock (1937)
G. 15. Don Fernando (1937)
G. 16. Cosmopolitans (1938, the original Preface!)
G. 17. Theatre (1939, New Preface)
G. 18. Christmas Holiday (1941)
G. 19. The Summing Up (1948)
G. 20. The Razor's Edge (1948)
G. 21. Catalina (1948)
G. 22. Creatures of Circumstance (1950)
G. 23. A Writer's Notebook (1951)
G. 24. The Magician (1956, New Preface)
G. 25. Then and Now (1959)
G. 26. Up At the Villa (????)
G. 27. The Explorer (1967)
G. 28. Merry-Go-Round (1969)

H. BOOKS EDITED BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
H. 1. The Traveller's Library, 1933
H. 2. Tellers of Tales, 1939
H. 3. Great Modern Reading, 1943
H. 4. The Ten Best Novels in the World, 1948-49, 10 vols.
H. 5. A Choice of Kipling's Prose, 1952

=====FULL VERSION=====

A: BOOKS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM

A. 1. NOVELS

A. 1. 1. Liza of Lambeth. See F. 4.
A. 1. 1. 1. T. Fisher Unwin, 1897. First Edition.
A. 1. 1. 2. Doran, 1921. First American Edition.
A. 1. 1. 3. Heinemann, 1930. Travellers' Library Edition. New 6pp Preface.
A. 1. 1. 4. Heinemann, 1934. The Collected Edition. New 21pp preface, expanded from 1930. Reprinted in 1950 and 1951.
A. 1. 1. 5. Heinemann, 1947. Jubilee Edition of 1000 copies signed by Maugham. New Preface, short and not altogether important. Contains also the part of the preface to The Collected Edition that concerns the novel.
A. 1. 1. 6. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains the full 1934 preface.

A. 1. 2. 1. L.C.Page, 1898. First Edition.
A. 1. 2. 2. T. Fisher Unwin, 1898. First English Edition.
A. 1. 2. 3. Kessinger Publishing, 2008. Reprint of an illustrated American edition from 1922.

A. 1. 3. The Hero.
A. 1. 3. 1. Hutchinson, 1901. First Edition.
A. 1. 3. 2. Kessinger Publishing, 2000. Apparently reprint of the First Edition. Very poor.
A. 1. 3. 3. Norilana Press, 2008. A much better reprint than A. 1. 3. 2.

A. 1. 4. Mrs. Craddock. See the entry in Norman Moore's collection.
A. 1. 4. 1. Heinemann, 1902. First Edition. Censored.
A. 1. 4. 2. Doran, 1920. First American Edition. Most probably contains the same omissions as the First Edition.
A. 1. 4. 3. Heinemann/Doubleday Doran, 1928. Restored and Revised Edition published from the original manuscript. New Preface. Not in Stott.
A. 1. 4. 4. Heinemann, 1937. The Collected Edition. Revisions and Preface from 1928.
A. 1. 4. 5. Heinemann, 1955. Preface revised and expanded from the 1928 edition. Revisions from 1928. See Stott A5, p. 34, for comparison of some passages between the First and the Revised editions.
A. 1. 4. 6. Vintage Classics, 2000. Revisions from 1928. Preface from 1955.

A. 1. 5. The Merry-Go-Round.
A. 1. 5. 1. Heinemann, 1904. First Edition.
A. 1. 5. 2. Doubleday, Page and Company, 1904. American Copyright issue, lodged with the Library of Congress (not for sale). Contains Chapter 1 from Part I and Chapters 1 and 15 from Part II. "Only parts of the chapters are printed, but sufficient to comply with the requirements of American copyright." See Stott A7.
A. 1. 5. 3. Vintage Classics, 2000.

A. 1. 6. The Bishop's Apron. See B. 5. No modern edition.
A. 1. 6. 1. Chapman and Hall, 1906. First Edition.

A. 1. 7. The Explorer. See B. 4.
A. 1. 7. 1. Heinemann, 1908. First Edition.
A. 1. 7. 2. Baker & Taylor, 1909. First American Edition.
A. 1. 7. 3. Heron, 1969. Together with The Land of the Blessed Virgin See A. 3. 1.
A. 1. 7. 4. Aegipian Press, 2000. A truly piratical paperback indeed!

A. 1. 8. The Magician.
A. 1. 8. 1. Heinemann, 1908. First Edition.
A. 1. 8. 2. Heinemann, 1956. The Collected Edition. Contains "A Fragment of Autobiography".
A. 1. 8. 3. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains "A Fragment of Autobiography".

A. 1. 9. Of Human Bondage.
A. 1. 9. 1. George H. Doran, 1915. First Edition.
A. 1. 9. 2. Heinemann, 1915. First English Edition.
A. 1. 9. 3. Heinemann, 1934. New Edition (reset). Contains new introduction titled “Instead of a Preface” featuring a Letter from a 16 years old Admirer and a Frontispiece portrait of the Author by Gerald Kelly.
A. 1. 9. 4. Doubleday Doran, 1936. First Illustrated Edition. New 3pp Foreword. Illustrated by Randolph Schwabe. Deluxe edition of 751 copies signet by the author and the illustrator. Later reprinted as cheaper edition. Never published in England
A. 1. 9. 5. Heinemann, 1937. The Collected Edition. Reprinted in 1942, 1948 and 1951. Contains the 1934 “Instead of a Preface”. See A. 1. 9. 3.
A. 1. 9. 6. Pocket books, 1950. Abridged and with New Introduction by the author. Reprinted in 1963 as Giant Cardinal Edition.
A. 1. 9. 7. Modern Library, 1999. Contains the 1936 Foreword. Introduction by Gore Vidal. Commentaries by Theodore Dreiser and Graham Greene.
A. 1. 9. 8. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains the 1936 Foreword. See A. 1. 9. 4.

A. 1. 10. The Moon and Sixpence. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 10. 1. Heinemann, 1919. First Edition.
A. 1. 10. 2. George H. Doran, 1919. First American Edition.
A. 1. 10. 3. Heinemann, 1935. The Collected Edition. New 4pp Preface. Reprinted in 1937, 1948, 1951 and 1962.
A. 1. 10. 4. Vintage Classics, 1999. Contains no preface at all!
*The part of the preface to vol. 2 of The Selected Novels dealing with The Moon and Sixpence is just a shortened version of the preface written in 1935 for The Collected Edition.

A. 1. 11. The Painted Veil. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 11. 1. George H. Doran, 1925. First Edition.
A. 1. 11. 2. Heinemann, 1925. First English Edition.
A. 1. 11. 3. Heinemann, 1934. The Collected Edition. New 5pp Preface. Reprinted in 1949, 1951 and 1963.
A. 1. 11. 4. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains the 1934 Preface.
*The part of the preface to vol. 2 of The Selected Novels dealing with The Painted Veil is just a shortened version of the preface written in 1934 for The Collected Edition.

A. 1. 12. Cakes and Ale. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 12. 1. Heinemann, 1930. First Edition.
A. 1. 12. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1930. First American Edition.
A. 1. 12. 3. Heinemann, 1934. The Collected Edition. New 6pp Preface. Reprinted in 1935, 1936, 1937, 1950 and 1952.
A. 1. 12. 4. Modern Library, 1950. New Preface. Here comes the notorious “confession” of Maugham that he had in mind Hugh Walpole when he created the character of Roy. He just had him in his mind, nothing more, nothing less; talking about cruel satirizing and malicious portrait are very wide of the mark indeed.
A. 1. 12. 5. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains the 1934 Preface.
*The part of the preface to vol. 1 of The Selected Novels dealing with Cakes and Ale is just a shortened version of the preface written in 1950 for the Modern Library edition.

A. 1. 13. The Narrow Corner. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 13. 1. Heinemann, 1932. First Edition.
A. 1. 13. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1932. First American Edition.
A. 1. 13. 3. Heinemann, 1934. The Collected Edition. New 4pp Preface. Reprinted in 1963.
A. 1. 13. 4. Vintage Classics, 2001. Contains the 1934 preface.
*The part of the preface to Vol. 2 of The Selected Novels dealing with The Narrow Corner is just a shortened version of the preface written in 1934 for The Collected Edition, but it does contain a few unique touches.

A. 1. 14. Theatre. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 14. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1937. First Edition.
A. 1. 14. 2. Heinemann, 1937. First English Edition.
A. 1. 14. 3. Heinemann, 1939. The Collected Edition. New 7pp Preface.
A. 1. 14. 4. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains the 1939 Preface.
*The part of the preface to vol. 1 of The Selected Novels dealing with Theatre is just a shortened version of the preface written in 1939 for The Collected Edition.

A. 1. 15. Christmas Holiday. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 15. 1. Heinemann, 1939. First Edition.
A. 1. 15. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1939. First American Edition.
A. 1. 15. 3. Heinemann, 1941. The Collected Edition. Reprinted in 1951 and 1989.
A. 1. 15. 4. Vintage Classics, 2001.
*To the best of my belief, the part of the preface to vol. 3 of The Selected Novels dealing with Christmas Holiday is the only place where Maugham mentioned something about the origins of that novel.

A. 1. 16. Up at the Villa. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 16. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1941. First Edition.
A. 1. 16. 1. Heinemann, 1941. First English Edition.
A. 1. 16. 1. Vintage Classics, 2004.
*To the best of my belief, the part of the preface to vol. 3 of The Selected Novels dealing with Up at the Villa is the only place where Maugham mentioned something about the origins of that novel.

A. 1. 17. The Hour Before the Dawn. No English Edition.
A. 1. 17. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1942. First Edition.
A. 1. 17. 2. Angus and Robertson, 1945. First Australian Edition.

A. 1. 18. The Razor's Edge. See F. 4.*
A. 1. 18. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1944. First Edition.
A. 1. 18. 2. Heinemann, 1944. First English Edition.
A. 1. 18. 3. Heinemann, 1948. The Collected Edition. Reprinted in 1967.
A. 1. 18. 4. Vintage Classics, 2000.
*To the best of my belief, the part of the preface to vol. 3 of The Selected Novels dealing with The Razor's Edge is the only place where Maugham mentioned something about the origins of that novel.

A. 1. 19. Then and Now.
A. 1. 19. 1. Heinemann, 1946. First Edition.
A. 1. 19. 2. Doubleday, 1946. First American Edition.
A. 1. 19. 3. Vintage Classics, 2001.

A. 1. 20. Catalina.
A. 1. 20. 1. Heinemann, 1948. First Edition.
A. 1. 20. 2. Doubleday, 1948. First American Edition.
A. 1. 20. 3. Vintage Classics, 2001.


A. 2. SHORT STORY COLLECTIONS
[first published in magazine under alternative title, if any]

A. 2. 1. Orientations.
A. 2. 1. 1. T. Fisher Unwin, 1899. First Edition. No American Edition.
6 Short Stories. See C. 1.
Contents:
A Bad Example [never published in magazine]
Daisy [never published in magazine]
De Amicitia [never published in magazine]
Faith [never published in magazine]
The Choice of Amyntas [never published in magazine]
The Punctiliousness of Don Sebastian [1898, as “Don Sebastian”*]
* Maugham's first published short story ever. He claimed that “A Bad Example” and “Daisy” were the first short stories he ever wrote when he was 18 years old.

A. 2. 2. The Trembling of a Leaf. Little Stories from the South Sea Islands.
A. 2. 2. 2. Heinemann, 1921. First English Edition.
A. 2. 2. 3. Heinemann, 1935. The Collected Edition. New 4pp Preface.
A. 2. 2. 4. Heron, 1968. Contains the 1935 Preface.
6 short stories together with two short pieces as an introduction and an epilogue.
Contents:
I. The Pacific [Introduction]
II. Mackintosh [1920]
III. The Fall of Edward Barnard [1921]
IV. Red [1921]
V. The Pool [1921]
VI. Honolulu [1921]
VII. Rain [1921, as “Miss Thompson”]
VIII. Envoi [Epilogue]

A. 2. 3. The Casuarina Tree.
A. 2. 3. 1. Heinemann, 1926. First Edition.
A. 2. 3. 2. George H. Doran, 1926. First American Edition.
A. 2. 3. 3. Heinemann, 1935. The Collected Edition. The Original Preface. Reprinted in 1953.
6 short stories + original preface and Postscript.
Contents:
The Casuarina Tree [preface]
The Letter [1924]
P. & O. [1923, as “Bewitched”]
Postscript

A. 2. 4. Ashenden. Or the British Agent.
A. 2. 4. 1. Heinemann, 1928. First Edition.
A. 2. 4. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1928. First American Edition.
A. 2. 4. 2. Heinemann, 1934. The Collected Edition. New 6pp Preface. Reprinted in 1948.
A. 2. 4. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1941. New 7pp Preface. Slightly expanded from the 1934 Preface.
A. 2. 4. 2. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains the 1934 Preface.
Contains 16 chapters. 15 of them later merged into six short stories.
Contents:
1. R. – 2. A Domiciliary Visit – 3. Miss King – 4. The Hairless Mexican – 5. The Dark Woman – 6. The Greek – 7. A Trip to Paris – 8. Giulia Lazzari – 9. Gustav – 10. The Traitor – 11. Behind the Scenes – 12. His Excellency – 13. The Flip of a Coin – 14. A Chance Acquaintance – 15. Love and Russian Literature – 16. Mr. Harrington's Washing
Chapters 1 to 3 later merged into “Miss King
Chapters 4 to 6 later merged into “The Hairless Mexican
Chapters 7 and 8 later merged into “Giulia Lazzari
Chapters 9 and 10 later merged into “The Traitor
Chapters 11 and 12 later merged in “His Excellency
Chapters 14 to 16 later merged into “Mr. Harrington's Washing

A. 2. 5. Six Stories Written in the First Person Singular.
A. 2. 5. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1931. First Edition.
A. 2. 5. 2. Heinemann, 1931. First English Edition.
A. 2. 5. 3. Heinemann, 1936. The Collected Edition. New 5pp Preface.
6 short stories. Original preface without title.
Contents:
[Preface]
Virtue [1931]
Jane [1923]

A. 2. 6. Ah King.
A. 2. 6. 1. Heinemann, 1933. First Edition.
A. 2. 6. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1933. First American Edition.
A. 2. 6. 3. Heinemann, 1936. The Collected Edition. New 6pp. Preface, greatly expanded from the original one.
6 short stories. Original preface.
Contents:
Ah King [preface]
The Book-Bag [never published in magazine*]
Neil Macadam [1932, as “The Temptation of Neil MacAdam”]

*Ray Long was compelled to turn down this brilliant short story since its plot is concerned with incest; although Maugham does not mention the word even once, the short story was considered too scandalous for the pages of Cosmopolitan. Ray Long, however, did publish the story in a book form after all; it was included in a volume with his favourite short stories subtitled 20 Best Short Stories in Ray Long's 20 Years as an Editor. He named the book The Book-Bag.

A. 2. 7. Cosmopolitans.
A. 2. 7. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1936. First Edition.
A. 2. 7. 2. Heinemann, 1936. First English Edition.                
A. 2. 7. 3. Heinemann, 1938. The Collected Edition. The Original Preface.
29 short stories. Original Preface.
Contents:
Preface
Raw Material [1923, as “The Impostors”]
Mayhew [1923]
German Harry [1924]
The Dream [1924]
The Luncheon* [1924]
Salvatore [1924, as “Salvatore the Fisherman”]
Home [1924, as “Home from the Sea”]
Mr. Know-All [1925]
The Escape [1925, as “The Widow's Might”]
A Friend in Need [1925, as “The Man Who Wouldn't Hurt a Fly”]
The Portrait of a Gentleman [1925, as “The Code of a Gentleman”]
The Judgement Seat [never published in magazine]
French Joe [1926, as “Another Man Without a Country”]
The Poet [1925, as “The Great Man”]
Louise [1925, as “The Most Selfish Woman I Ever Knew”]
The Promise [1925, as “An Honest Woman”]
A String of Beads [1927, as “Pearls”]
The Bum [1929, as “A Derelict”]
The Verger [1929, as “The Man Who Made His Mark”]
The Wash Tub [1929, as “In Hiding”]
The Social Sense [1929, as “The Extraordinary Sex”]

*Significantly rewritten version of “Cousin Amy” which was first published in magazine in 1908 but had to wait more than 60 years to appear in book form: Seventeen Lost Stories (1969). See C. 1.

A. 2. 8. The Mixture as Before.
A. 2. 8. 1. Heinemann, 1940. First Edition.
A. 2. 8. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1940. First American Edition.
10 short stories. Original Foreword.
Contents:
Foreword
The Treasure [1934, as "The Best Ever"]
Lord Mountdrago [1939, as “Doctor and Patient”]

A. 2. 9. Creatures of Circumstance.
A. 2. 9. 1. Heinemann, 1947. First Edition.
A. 2. 9. 2. Doubleday, 1947. First American Edition.
15 short stories. Original preface “The Author Excuses Himself”.
Contents:
The Author Excuses Himself [preface]
The Mother* [1909]
Sanatorium [1938]
Winter Cruise [1943, as “The Captain and Miss Reid”]
A Man from Glasgow [1905, as "Told in the Inn at Algeciras"]***
Episode [1947]
The Kite [never published in magazine]

*This appears to be one of the very few cases when Maugham was satisfied with an early work of his. “The Mother” was first published in Story Teller for April, 1909; nearly 40 years later it was only slightly revised for its inclusion in Creatures of Circumstance (1947). The early version was reprinted in magazine on same year (Liberty, 26 April 1947, not in Stott) and first appeared in book form 11 years later, The Cassell Miscellany (1958). See also D. 17. and E. 1.      

**First published in Cassell's Magazine in 1908 but later significantly rewritten. The later version appeared in Redbook (February, 1943) and in Creatures of Circumstance four years later. The early version is reprinted in Seventeen Lost Stories (1969); see C. 2.

***The early version is reprinted in The Ash-Tree Press Annual Macabre 1998, ed. Jack Adrian. It was only slightly revised for its first inclusion in book form some 40 years later; only the second such case after “The Mother”.


A. 3. TRAVEL BOOKS

A. 3. 1. The Land of the Blessed Virgin. Sketches and Impressions in Andalusia.
A. 3. 1. 1. Heinemann, 1904. First Edition.
A. 3. 1. 2. Knopf, 1920. First American Edition. Second edition from the same year retitled Andalusia.
A. 3. 1. 3. Heron, 1968. Together with The Explorer. See A. 1. 7.
A. 3. 1. 4. Kessinger Publishing, 2000. Reprint of thr Heinemann edition from 1905.

A. 3. 2. On a Chinese Screen. 58 short sketches. See F. 6.
A. 3. 2. 1. George H. Doran, 1922. First American Edition.
A. 3. 2. 2. Heinemann, 1922. First English Edition.
A. 3. 2. 3. Heinemann, 1935. The Collected Edition. New 4pp Preface. Reprinted in 1953, 1957, 1962 and 1969.
A. 3. 2. 4. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains no preface at all!
Contents:
I The Rising of the Curtain – II My Lady's Parlour – III The Mongol Chief – IV The Rolling Stone – V The Cabinet Minister – VI Dinner Parties – VII The Altar of Heaven – VIII The Servants of God – IX The Inn – X The Glory Hole – XI Fear – XII The Picture – XIII His Britannic Majesty's Representative – XIV The Opium Den – XV The Last Chance – XVI The Nun – XVII Henderson – XVIII Dawn – XIX The Point of Honour – XX The Beast of Burden – XXI Dr Macalister – XXII The Road – XXIII God's Truth – XXIV Romance – XXV The Grand Style – XXVI Rain – XXVII Sullivan – XXVIII The Dining-Room – XXIX Arabesque – XXX The Consul* – XXXI The Stripling – XXXII The Fannings – XXXIII The Song of the River – XXXIV Mirage – XXXV The Stranger – XXXVI Democracy – XXXVII The Seventh Day Adventist – XXXVIII The Philosopher – XXXIX The Missionary Lady – XL A Game of Billiards – XLI The Skipper – XLII The Sights of the Town – XLIII Nightfall – XLIV The Normal Man – XLV The Old Timer – XLVI The Plain – XLVII Failure – XLVIII A Student of the Drama – XLIX The Taipan* – L Metempsychosis – LI The Fragment – LII One of the Best – LIII The Sea-Dog – LIV The Question – LV The Sinologue – LVI The Vice-Consul – LVII A City Built on a Rock – LVIII A Libation to the Gods
*Later published under the same titles in The Complete Short Stories (1951), see F. 1.

A. 3. 3. The Gentleman in the Parlour. A Record of a Journey From Rangoon to Haiphong. See F. 6.
A. 3. 3. 1. Heinemann, 1930. First Edition.
A. 3. 3. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1930. First American Edition.
A. 3. 3. 3. Heinemann, 1935. The Collected Edition. New 4pp Preface.
A. 3. 3. 4. Vintage Classics, 2001. Contains the 1935 Preface.

Five chapters were published in The Complete Short Stories (F. 1.) under different names as follows:
Chapter VI – “Mabel”.
Chapter X – “Masterson”.
Chapter XXXII – “Princess September”.
Chapter XXXIV – “A Marriage of Convenience”.
Chapter XLIII – “Mirage”.
The last but one is of course a rewritten version of the early short story with the same name that is reprinted in Seventeen Lost Stories (1969); see C. 1. In magazines “Masterson” and “Princess September” were published as “On the Road to Mandalay” (1929) and “The Princess and the Nightingale” (1922), respectively. The others appeared in magazines under the same titles, except “Mabel”; see E. 2.

“Mirage”, “Princess September” and “A Marriage of Convenience” also appeared as “The Opium Addict”, “September's Bird” and “The French Governor”, respectively, in a volume titled The Maugham Reader (1950); see F. 9.
[Thank you, Daniel! :-)]


A. 4. NON-FICTION

A. 4. 1. Don Fernando. See F. 6.
A. 4. 1. 1. Heinemann, 1935. First Edition
A. 4. 1. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1935. First American Edition.
A. 4. 1. 3. Heinemann, 1937. The Collected Edition.
A. 4. 1. 4. Heinemann, 1950. Revised Edition. Contains new “Author's Note” as a preface. One of the very few examples when Maugham was able to profit from his critics and revise a book in order to improve it.
A. 4. 1. 5. Vintage Classics, 2000. Contains the revisions and the “Author's Note” from 1950.

A. 4. 2. The Summing Up. See F. 5.
A. 4. 2. 1. Heinemann, 1938. First Edition.
A. 4. 2. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1938. First American Edition.
A. 4. 2. 1. Vintage Classics, 2001.

A. 4. 3. France at War. Little propaganda book.
A. 4. 3. 1. Heinemann, 1940. First Edition. Paperback.
A. 4. 3. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1940. First American Edition.

A. 4. 4. Books and You.
A. 4. 4. 1. Heinemann, 1940. First Edition.
A. 4. 4. 2. Doubleday Doran, 1940. First American Edition.
Original Preface. Otherwise this book consists of three magazine articles with reading recommendations collected together. Originally appeared in The Saturday Evening Post as “Books and You” (4 February 1939), “You and Some More Books” (11 March 1939) and “The Classic Books of America” (6 January 1940). The book was published in March 1940.

A. 4. 5. Strictly Personal. Little anti-propaganda book.
A. 4. 5. 1. Doubleday Doran, 1941. First Edition.
A. 4. 5. 2. Heinemann, 1942. First English Edition. Contains a letter to Eddie Marsh. Chapter 15 omitted due to censorship.

A. 4. 6. Great Novelists and Their Novels.
A. 4. 6. 1. Winston, 1948. First Edition.
Original introductory chapter called “The Ten Best Novels of the World”. Contains collection of introductory essays for “The Ten Best Novels in the World”; see H. 4. Illustrated with pen and ink portraits of the authors by Robert W. Arnold.

A. 4. 6a. Ten Novels and Their Authors.
A. 4. 6a. 1. Heinemann, 1954. First Edition.
A. 4. 6a. 2. Doubleday, 1955. First American Edition, as The Art of Fiction: An Introduction to Ten Novels and Their Authors.
A. 4. 6a. 3. Vintage Classics, 2001.
Revised and expanded version of A. 4. 6., including the introductory chapter, titled here “The Art of Fiction”, and the postscript, titled “In Conclusion”. See also H. 4.

A. 4. 7. A Writer's Notebook. Maugham's notes, 1892-1949. Original Preface. See F. 5.
A. 4. 7. 1. Heinemann, 1949. First Edition.
A. 4. 7. 2. Doubleday, 1949. First American Edition.
A. 4. 7. 3. Vintage Classics, 2001. Contains the original Preface.

A. 4. 8. The Vagrant Mood. Six essays.
A. 4. 8. 1. Heinemann, 1952. First Edition.
A. 4. 8. 2. Doubleday, 1953. First American Edition
A. 4. 8. 3. Vintage Classics, 2001.
Contents: Augustus – Zurbaran – The Decline and Fall of the Detective Story – After Reading Burke – Reflections on a Certain Book – Some Novelists I Have Known

A. 4. 9. Points of View. Five essays.
A. 4. 9. 1. Heinemann, 1958. First Edition.
A. 4. 9. 2. Doubleday, 1959. First American Edition.
A. 4. 9. 3. Vintage Classics, 2000.
Contents: The three novels of a poet – The saint – Prose and Dr. Tillotson – The short story – Three journalists


B. PLAYS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
(Written – First produced – First published)

B. 1. Marriages are made in Heaven (1896-97 – 1902 – unpublished).
A play in one act. First produced in Schall und Rauch, Berlin, on January 9, 1902, as Schiffbrüchig (Shipwrecked), a German adaptation by Maugham himself (8 performances). Never produced in English. No publication edition, but it was published in The Venture (1903) as Marriages are Made in Heaven. Reprinted in A Traveller in Romance (1984) under the same title; see C. 2.

B. 2. Mademoiselle Zampa (1896-97 – 1904 – unpublished).
A New One-act Farce. No publication edition, but it was published in The Sketch (1905) as A Rehearsal. Reprinted in A Traveller in Romance (1984); see C. 2. First produced by Muriel Wylford at Avenue Theatre, London, on February 18, 1904 (20 performances), as a curtain-raiser to The Man on Honour.

B. 3. A Man of Honour (1898/rev. 1902 – 1903 – 1903, Chapman and Hall).
A New Modern Play in Four Acts. Maugham's first full-length play to be produced: by the Stage Society at the Imperial Theatre, London, on February 22, 1903 (evening); repeated on February 23 (matinée); with H. Granville-Barker (Basil) and Winifred Freiser (Jenny). First presented in public by Muriel Wylford at the Avenue Theatre, London, February 18, 1904 (28 performances), with Ben Webster (Basil) and Muriel Wylford (Jenny). First published by Chapman and Hall on February 18, 1903 (150 copies), one of the rarest of Maugham’s first editions. Reprinted in Fortnightly Review, March 1903. Published by Heinemann in 1912 as “Tragedy in Four Acts”. The plot was reused for The Merry-Go-Round (1904); see A. 1. 5.

B. 4. The Explorer (1899 – 1908 – 1912, Heinemann).
A Play in Four Acts. First published as “A Melodrama in Four Acts”. Novelised and published under the same title in 1908; see A. 1. 7. First produced by Lewis Waller at the Lyric Theatre on June 13, 1908 (48 performances) with Lewis Waller (Alexander Mackenzie), revived by him (in a Revised Version) at the same theatre, May 19, 1909 (7 performances).

B. 5. Loaves and Fishes (1903 – 1911 – 1924, Heinemann).
A Satire in Four Acts. Novelised as The Bishop's Apron and published in 1906; see A. 1. 6. First published in play form as “A Comedy in Four Acts”. First produced by Charles Frohman at The Duke of York's Theatre, London, on February 24, 1911 (48 performances), with Robert Loraine (Canon Spratte). Revived by Peter Cotes at the New Boltons Theatre, London, March 27, 1951 (24 performances), with Kynaston Reeves (Canon Spratte).

B. 6. Lady Frederick (1903 – 1907 – 1912, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Comedy in Three Acts. First produced by Otho Stuart at the Royal Court Theatre, London, on October 26, 1907; transferred to the Garrick Theatre, March 10, 1908; to the Criterion Theatre, April 27, 1908; to the New Theatre, June 8, 1908; and to the Haymarket Theatre, August 1, 1908; 422 performances overall; with Ethel Irving (Lady Frederick) and C. M. Lowne (Paradine Fouldes). First produced on Broadway by Charles Frohman at the Hudson Theatre, November 9, 1908 (96 performances), with Ethel Barrymore (Lady Frederick) and Bruce McRae (Paradine Fouldes). Revived by Gilbert Porteous at the Globe Theatre, London, April 26, 1913 (57 performances), and by Firth Shepherd at the Savoy Theatre, London, November 21, 1946 (144 performances). Maugham's first great success on the stage.

B. 7. Mrs. Dot (1904 – 1908 – 1912, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Light Comedy in Three Acts. First published as “A Farce in Three Acts”. Originally titled Worthley's Entire. First produced by Charles Frohman and Arthur Chudleigh at the Comedy Theatre, London, April 27, 1908 (272 performances), with Marie Tempest (Mrs Dot) and Fred Kerr (James Blenkinsop). First produced on Broadway by Charles Frohman at the Lyceum Theatre, January 24, 1910 (72 performances), with Billy Burke (Mrs. Worthley) and Fred Kerr (James Blenkinsop).

B. 8. Jack Straw (1907 – 1908 – 1912, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A New Comedy in Three Acts. First published as “A Farce in Three Acts”. First produced by A. and C. Gatti at the Vaudeville Theatre, London, on March 26, 1908 (321 performances), with Charles Hawtrey (Jack Straw). Revived by Thomas C. Dagnall at the Criterion Theatre, London, April 18, 1923 (90 performances), with Charles Hawtrey (Jack Straw). First produced on Broadway by Charles Frohman at the Empire Theatre, September 14, 1908 (112 performances), with John Drew (Jack Straw).  

B. 9. Penelope (1908 – 1909 – 1912, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Comedy in Three Acts. Originally titled Man and Wife. Written for Marie Tempest. First produced by Charles Frohman at the Comedy Theatre, London, January 9, 1909 (246 performances), with Marie Tempest (Penelope).

B. 10. The Tenth Man (1909 – 1910 – 1913, Heinemann).
A Play in Three Acts. First published as “A Tragic Comedy in Three Acts”. First produced by Charles Frohman and Arthur Bourchier at the Globe Theatre, London, February 24, 1910 (65 performances), with Arthur Bourchier (George Winter).

B. 11. Smith (1909 – 1909 – 1913, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Comedy in Four Acts. First produced by Charles Frohman at the Comedy Theatre, London, on September 30, 1909 (168 performances), with Marie Lohr (Smith) and Robert Loraine (Thomas Freeman). First produced on Broadway by Charles Frohman at the Empire Theatre, September 5, 1910 (112 performances), with Mary Boland (Smith) and John Drew (Thomas Freeman).  

B. 12. Landed Gentry (1910 – 1910 – 1913, Heinemann).
A Play in Four Acts. First published as “A Comedy in Four Acts”. Also titled Grace. First produced by Charles Frohman at the Duke of York's Theatre, London, October 15, 1910 (72 performances), with Irene Vanbrugh (Grace Insole) and Lady Tree (Mrs Insole). Revived at the same place and with largely the same cast, February 6, 1911 (8 performances).

B. 13. The Land of Promise (1913 – 1913 – 1913, Bickers & Son Ltd.). See F. 3.
A Play in Four Acts. The rarest of all Maugham's printed works: only 25 copies of the true first edition from 1913 exist. First edition for the general public by Heinemann in 1922. First produced by Charles Frohman at the Hyperion Theatre, New Haven, Conn., November 26, 1913; subsequently at the Lyceum Theatre, New York, December 25, 1913 (76 performances); with Billie Burke (Norah Marsh). First produced in London by Charles Frohman at the Duke of York’s Theatre, February 26, 1914 (185 performances), with Irene Vanbrugh (Nora Marsh).

B. 14. The Unattainable (1915 – 1916 – 1923, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Farce in Three Acts. Originally produced with the title Caroline at the New Theatre on February 8, 1916 with Irene Vanbrugh.

B. 15. Our Betters (1915 – 1917 – 1923, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Comedy in Three Acts. First produced, causing considerable controversy, by John D. Williams at the Nixon Theatre, Atlantic City, N.J., March 8, 1917; subsequently at the Hudson Theatre, New York, March 12, 1917 (112 performances), with Chrystal Herne (Pearl), Rose Goghlan (Duchess of Surennes), Leonore Harris (Princess), John Flood (Arthur Fenwick) and Diantha Pattison (Bessie). First produced in London by Anthony Prinsep at the Globe Theatre, September 12, 1923 (548 performances), with Margaret Bannerman (Pearl), Constance Collier (Duchess of Surennes), Marion Terry (Princess), Henry Ford (Arthur Fenwick) and Alice Mosley (Bessie).

B. 16. Love in a Cottage (1917 – 1918 – unpublished).
A Play in Four Acts. First produced by Anthony Prinsep and Marie Lohr at the Globe Theatre, January 26, 1918 (127 performances), with Marie Lohr (Sybil Bruce) and Haidee Wright (Mrs Butterfield). Never published.

B. 17. Caesar's Wife (1918 – 1919 – 1922, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Comedy in Three Acts. First produced by Vedrenne and Eadie at the Royalty Theatre, March 27, 1919 (241 performances), with Fay Compton (Violet) and C. Aubrey Smith (Sir Arthur Little). First produced on Broadway by Florence Ziegfield Jr. at the Liberty Theatre, November 24, 1919 (81 performances), with Billie Burke (Violet) and Norman Trevor (Sir Arthur Little).

B. 18. Home and Beauty (1919 – 1919 – 1923, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Farce in Three Acts. First produced under the title Too Many Husbands by A. H. Woods at the Globe Theatre, Atlantic City, U.S.A., August 4, 1919 (15 performances), with Estelle Winwood (Victoria), Kenneth Douglas (William) and Ernest Lawford (Atlantic City) / Lawrence Grossmith (NY) (Frederick). First produced in England by Frank Curzon and Gladys Cooper at The Playhouse, London, August 30, 1919 (235 performances), with Gladys Cooper (Victoria) and Charles Hawtrey (William) and Malcolm Cherry (Frederick).

B. 19. The Circle (1919 – 1921 – 1921, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Comedy in Three Acts. First produced by J. E. Vedrenne at the Haymarket Theatre, London, March 3, 1921 (181 performances), with Fay Compton (Elizabeth), E. Holman Clark (C. C.-Cheney), Ernest Thesinger (Arnold Champion-Cheney), Allan Aynesworth (Lord Porteous), Lottie Venne (Kitty) and Leon Quartermaine (Edward Luton). Revived by J. and R. Gatti at the Vaudeville Theatre, London, March 2, 1931 (86 perfomances), and by Tennenth Plays Ltd. at the Haymarket Theatre, London, October 11, 1944 (110 performances in repertory). First produced on Broadway by the Selwyns at the Selwyn Theatre, September 12, 1921 (175 performances), with Estelle Winwood (Elizabeth), Ernest Lawford (C. C.-Cheney), John Drew (Lord Porteous), Mrs. Leslie Carter (Kitty) and John Halliday (Edward Luton).

B. 20. The Unknown (1920 – 1920 – 1920, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Play in Three Acts. First produced by Viola Tree at the Aldwych Theatre, London, August 9, 1920 (77 performances), with Basil Rathbone (John Wharton), Lady Viola Tree (Mrs Wharton), to whom the play is dedicated, Haidée Wright (Mrs Littlewood), who caused Maugham to say he had never seen such a moving performance, and Ellen O’Malley (Sylvia). Broadly the same basic theme as in the novel The Hero (1901); see A. 1. 3.

B. 21. East of Suez (1922 – 1922 – 1922, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Play in Seven Scenes. Maugham's theatrical "spectacle" with a large cast of Chinese extras and an orchestra playing incidental music composed by Eugene Goossens. First produced by George Grossmith and J. A. E. Malone at His Majesty's Theatre, London, September 2, 1922 (209 performances), with Basil Rathbone (George Conway) and Meggie Albanesi/Norah Robinson (Daisy).

B. 22. The Camel's Back (1923 – 1923 – unpublished).
A New Farce in Three Acts. First produced by the Selwyns at the Worcester Theatre, Worcester, Mass., October 29, 1923, and subsequently at the Vanderbilt Theatre, New York, November 13, 1923 (15 performances). First produced in England by Frank Curzon at the Playhouse, London, January 31, 1924 (76 performances).

B. 23. The Road Uphill (1924 – unproduced – unpublished).
Never produced or published. Broadly the same main theme as Maugham later used in his most successful novel, The Razor's Edge (1944).

B. 24. The Constant Wife (1926 – 1926 – 1927, George H. Doran). See F. 3.
A Comedy in Three Acts. First produced by Charles Frohman Co. at the Ohio Theatre, Cleveland, Ohio, November 1, 1926; subsequently at the Maxine Elliott Theatre, November 29, 1926 (295 performances), with Ethel Barrymore (Constance) and C. Aubrey Smith (John). First produced in England by Horace Watson at the Strand Theatre, London, April 6, 1927 (70 performances), with Fay Compton (Constance) and Leon Quartermaine (John).

B. 25. The Letter (1927 – 1927 – 1927, Heinemann).
A Play in Three Acts. Firmly based on Maugham's own story of the same title from The Casuarina Tree (1926). First produced by Gladys Cooper at the Playhouse, London, February 24, 1927 (338 performances), with Gladys Cooper (Leslie Crosbie), Leslie Faber (Howard Joyce), Nigel Bruce (Robert Crosbie) and George Carr (Ong Chi Seng). The play has two different endings, the original one and an additional “flashback” scene between Leslie and Geoff; the latter was acted at the Playhouse, Maugham preferred the former for the printed version (but included both, the flashback as an appendix). First produced on Broadway by Messmore Kendall at the Morosco Theatre, September 26, 1927 (104 performances), with Katharine Cornell (Leslie), Allan Jeayes (Howard Joyce) and J. W. Austin (Robert Crosbie). The play was imaginatively directed for the screen by William Wyler in 1940, starring Bette Davis (Leslie), James Stephenson (Howard Joyce) and Herbert Marshall (Robert Crosbie).

B. 26. The Sacred Flame (1928 – 1928 – 1928, Doubleday Doran). See F. 3.
A Play in Three Acts. First produced by Messmore Kendall and Gilbert Miller at the Belasco Theatre, Washington; November 12, 1928; subsequently at the Henry Miller’s Theatre, New York, November 19, 1928 (24 performances), with Mary Jerrold (Mrs Tabret), Casha Pringle (Stella), Clare Eames (Nurse) and Robert Harris (Maurice). First produced in England by Gladys Cooper at the Playhouse, London, February 8, 1929 (209 performances), with Marry Jerrold (Mrs Tabret), Gladys Cooper (Stella), Clare Eames (Nurse) and Richard Bird (Maurice). Revived by Jack De Leon at the St. Martin’s Theatre, London, November 22, 1945 (matinees), transferred to the Westminster Theatre, London (evenings), March 4, 1946 (181 performances). Revived in 1966 at the Duke of York’s Theatre, London, with Gladys Cooper (Mrs Tabret), Lana Morris (Stella), Wendy Hiller (Nurse) and John Merivale (Maurice).

B. 27. The Breadwinner (1930 – 1930 – 1930, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Comedy. Published as “The Bread-Winner”. First produced by J. and R. Gatti and Ronald Squire at the Vaudeville Theatre, London, September 30, 1930 (158 performances), with Jack Hawkins (Patrick), Peggy Ashcroft (Judy), Marie Lohr (Margery) and Ronald Squire (Charles). Revived by the Arts Theatre Group of Actors at the Arts Theatre, London, October 19, 1944 (30 performances), and January 28, 1953 (31 performances).

B. 28. For Services Rendered (1932 – 1932 – 1932, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Play in Three Acts. First produced by Barry Jackson at the Globe Theatre, London, November 1, 1932, subsequently at the Queen’s Theatre, January 2, 1933 (78 performances), with Ralph Richardson (Collie), Flora Robson (Evie), Marjorie Mars (Lois), S. J. Warmington (Wilfred), C. V. France (Leonard Ardsley), Diana Hamilton (Ethel), W. Cronin-Wilson (Howard) and Cedric Hardwicke (Sydney). Revived by Peter Cotes at the New Lindsey Theatre, London, July 2, 1946 (40 performances), with Arthur Howard (Collie), Joan Miller (Evie), Ilona Ference (Lois), Howard Douglas (Wilfred), Julian d’Albie (Leonard Ardsley), Doreen Richards (Ethel), Kenneth Buckley (Howard) and Reginald Purdell (Sydney).

B. 29. Sheppey (1932 – 1933 – 1933, Heinemann). See F. 3.
A Play in Three Acts. First produced by Alban B. Limpus at Wyndham's Theatre, London, September 14, 1933 (83 performances), directed by John Gielgud, to whom the play is dedicated, and starring Ralph Richardson (Sheppey). Maugham's farewell to the stage.

The plays The Noble Spaniard (1908), The Perfect Gentleman (1912) and The Mask and the Face (1933) were not written by Maugham but only translated and/or adapted by him from the French and Italian originals of Grenet-Dancourt, Moliere and Chiarelli, respectively.


C. POSTHUMOUSLY PUBLISHED BOOKS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM

C. 1. Seventeen Lost Stories, Doubleday, 1969.
Edited by Craig Showalter. Contains 17 early short stories first published between 1899 and 1908, including the six that made Maugham’s first published collection, Orientations (1899, A. 2. 1.). None of the other 11 had ever appeared in book form before but they were all published in magazines between 1900 and 1908. Includes the early versions of “A Marriage of Convenience” (see A. 3. 3.), “The Luncheon” (as “Cousin Amy”, see A. 2. 7.) and “The Happy Couple” (see A. 2. 9.).
Contents:
A Bad Example (1899)
Daisy (1899)
De Amicitia (1899)
Faith (1899)
The Choice of Amyntas (1899)
The Punctiliousness of Don Sebastian (1899, in book form. See A. 2. 1.)
Lady Habart (1900)
Cupid and the Vicar of Swale (1900)
Pro Patria (1903)
A Point of Law (1903)
An Irish Gentleman (1904)
A Marriage of Convenience* (1906)
Flirtation (1906, written in 1904)
The Fortunate Painter (1908, as “The Fortunate Painter and the Honest Jew”)
Good Manners (1907)
Cousin Amy** (1908)
The Happy Couple*** (1908)

*Later significantly rewritten and published as part of the travel book The Gentleman in the Parlour (1930) and, under this title, in The Complete Short Stories (1951). See A. 3. 3. and F. 1.

**Later significantly rewritten and published under the title “The Luncheon” in the short story collection Cosmopolitans (1936). See A. 2. 7.

***Later significantly rewritten and published under the same title in the short story collection Creatures of Circumstance (1947). See A. 2. 9.

C. 2. A Traveller in Romance, Clarkson N. Potter, 1984.
Edited by John Whitehead. Contains 65 short pieces spanning 63 years of Maugham's life never published before in any of his books: prefaces and introductions to the works of others, magazine articles, book reviews, curtain-raisers. Almost exclusively non-fiction but it does contain also four short stories, three early ones published in magazines before the First World War and “The Buried Talent”: first published in 1934, never appeared in book form during Maugham's lifetime.
Contents:
Curtain-raisers
1. Marriages are made in Heaven, Venture (1903). See B. 1.
2. A Rehearsal, The Sketch (1905). See B. 2.
On Players and Playwrights
1. Introduction to The Truth at Last by Charles Hawtrey (1924)
2. Preface to Our Puppet Show by Francis de Croisset (1929)
3. Introduction to Bitter-Sweet and Other Plays by Noel Coward (1929)
4. Foreword to Gallery Unreserved by A. Galleryite [F. T. Bason] (1931)
5. Tribute to Marie Tempest, Souvenir Programme (1935)
6. Gladys Cooper - Introduction to Without Veils by Sewell Stokes (1953)
On Painters and Painting
1. Gerald Kelly - A Student of Character, International Studio (1914)
2. Gerald Kelly - Preface to An Exhibition of Paintings by Sir Gerald Kelly, The Leicester Galleries, London (1950).
3. Preface to catalogue of exhibition Flower Paintings by Marie Laurencin (1934)
4. Paintings I Have Liked, Life (1941)
5. Preface to Peter Arno's Cartoon Review (1942)
6. The Lady from Poonah - Maugham's speech given on 2 May 1951 at the Royal Academy's Annual Banquet in London. Condensed version printed in News Chronicle (1951).
7. Introduction to The Artist and the Theatre by Raymond Mander and Joe Mitcheson (1955)
8. On Having My Portrait Painted, Horizon (1959)
9. On Selling My Collection of Impressionist and Modern Pictures - Preface to Sotheby's Auction Catalogue (1962).
On Writers and Writing
1. On Writing for the Films, North American Review (1921)
2. Novelist or Bond Salesman, Bookman (N. Y.) (1925)
3. On Prefaces, Critics and a Novel - Preface to Two Made Their Bed by Louis Marlow (1929).
4. Preface to The House with Green Shutters by George Douglas (1938)
5. Introduction to his anthology Modern English and American Literature (1943)
6. Write About What You Know, Good Housekeeping (1943)
7. Variations on a Theme Dorothy Parker - Introduction to Dorothy Parker, Viking Portable Library (1944).
8. A Plan to Encourage Young Writers - Maugham's Address given on 30 September 1950 at the Book and Author Luncheon in Hotel Astor, N. Y.,  New York Herald Tribune (1950).
9. On Story-Telling - Address given at the National Institute of Arts and Letters, New York, on 17 October 1950. Reprinted in 1950.
10. Preface to Letters from Madame de la Marquise de Sevigne edited by Violet Hammersley (1955)
Book Reviews
1. The Ionian Sea by George Gissing, Sunday Sun (1901)
2. Growing-Up - Twenty-Five by Beverly Nichols, Sunday Times (1926)
3. Books of the Year, Sunday Times (1955)
On His Own Work
1. How Novelists Draw Their Characters, Bookman (1922)
2. Preface to A Bibliography of the Writings of W. Somerset Maugham by F. T. Bason (1931)
3. Of Human Bondage: With Digression on the Art of Fiction - Address given by Maugham on 20 April 1946 to the Library of Congress (1946).
4. Behind the Story, Wings (1946)
5. By A Way of Preface to A Comprehensive Exhibition of Writings of W. Somerset Maugham (1958)
Short Stories
1. The Spanish Priest, Illustrated London News (1906)
2. The Making of Millionaire, Lady's Realm (1906)
3. A Traveller in Romance, Printer's Pie Annual (1909)
4. The Buried Talent, Nash's Magazine (1934)
Wartime Articles in America
1. In the Bus, Allied Relief Ball Souvenir Program (1940)
2. Reading Under Bombing, Living Age (1940)
3. The Culture That is to Come, Redbook (1941)
4. The Noblest Act, This Week (1942)
5. Why D'You Dislike Us?, Saturday Evening Post (1942)
6. To Know about England and the English, Publishers' Weekly (1942)
7. Morale Made in American, Redbook (1942)
8. Virtue, Redbook (1943)
9. Reading and Writing and You, Redbook (1943)
10. We Have a Common Heritage, Redbook (1943)
11. What Reading Can Do For You, Life Story Magazine (1945)
12. ''Above all, love...'', Rotarian (1952)
On People and Places
1. My South Sea Island, Daily Mail (1922)
2. Preface to What a Life! by Doris Arthur-Jones (1932)
3. The Terrorist: Boris Savinkov, Redbook (1943)
4. Spanish Journey, Continental Daily Mail (1948)
5. From Nelson Doubleday 1889-1949, privately printed (1950)
6. Eddie Marsh - Proof-Reading as an Avocation, Publishers' Weekly (1939). See D. 5.
7. Eddie Marsh - From Sketches for a composite literary portrait of Sir Edward Marsh, London, Lund Humphries, (1953).
8. Foreword to Memoirs of Aga Khan (1954)
On Himself
1. On the Approach of Middle Age, Vanity Fair (1923)
2. Self-Portrait, from Portraits and Self-Portraits by G. Schreiber (1936)
3. Sixty-Five, in W. Somerset Maugham: Novelist, Essayist, Dramatist, A pamphlet  about his work, together with a Bibliography, an Appreciation by Richard Aldington. and New Note on Writing by Mr Maugham (1939)
4. On Playing Bridge
4.1. Introduction to Standard Book of Bidding by C. H. Goren (1944)
4.2. How I Like to Play Bridge, Good Housekeeping (1944)
5. Looking Back on Eighty Years, Listener, Home Service Broadcast on 28 January 1954
6. On His Ninetieth Birthday - W. Somerset Maugham talking to Ewan MacNaughton, Sunday Express (1964)

The last piece is actually not written by Maugham himself. It is a patch work with quotations from his books and his thoughts guided by Ewan MacNaughton who found the almost 90 years old Maugham feeble and with a good many blanks in his memory. The piece was approved by Maugham before publication.


D. PAMPHLETS AND CONTRIBUTIONS TO BOOKS OF OTHERS
BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
NB. Doubtful pieces or such that have never appeared in any of his books or in Seventeen Lost Stories (C. 1.) and A Traveller in Romance (C. 2.).

D. 1. My Favorite Story. International Magazine Co., 1928. Reprints “Red” from The Trembling of a Leaf (1921). Contains also a short introduction by Maugham why he chose this story.

D. 2. How Writers Write: Essays by Contemporary Authors. Edited by N. S. Tillett, Oxford, Toronto, Crowell, 1937. Contains “How I Write Short Stories” by Maugham, pp. 69-82. Most probably this is the preface to East and West (see F. 2.) which also appeared in Saturday Review of Literature on 28 July 1934; see E. 6.

D. 3. The Harvest. Leipzig, Bernard Tauchnitz, MCMXXXVII. Jubilee edition of Tauchnitz to celebrate 100 years of publishing, 1837-1937. Contains a letter by Maugham.

D. 4. Wisdom of Life: An Anthology of Noble Thoughts. London Watts, 1938. Apparently contains some noble, but still unidentified, thoughts of Maugham.

D. 5. A Number of People by Sir Edward Marsh. New York, Harper Bros., 1939. Contains preface by Maugham, not in the English edition. It might - or might not – be identical with the piece dedicated to Eddie Marsh and published the same year in Publishers' Weekly under the title “Proof-Reading as an Avocation”. See C. 2.

D. 6. An Appeal for the Hospitals. Bundles for Britain, WWII exhibition catalogue, 1941. Contains one page appeal by Maugham for charitable contributions to British hospitals damaged in the war.

D. 7. Modern English Readings by R. S. Loomis and D. L. Clark, Eds. New York, Farrar, 1942. Contains “Writing Prose” by Maugham; a word for word excerpt from The Summing Up (1938); see A. 4. 2.

D. 8. The English Spirit, Edited and with Introduction by Anthony Weymouth. London, George Allen & Unwin Ltd., 1942, and New York, Norton, 1944. Contains “Twenty Days in a Ship” by Maugham pp. 40-45, a piece dealing with incidents described in Strictly Personal (A. 4. 5.) in a similar, but by no means identical, language.

D. 9. The Magician by Frank Bruno. Viking Press, 1946. Introduction by Maugham.

D. 10. Paul Gauguin by Raymond Cogniat. Wildenstein & Co., April 1946.
Art catalogue with Introduction by Maugham.

D. 11. Of Human Bondage, with a Digression on the Art of Fiction: An address. Pamphlet, Library of Congress, 1946. An address given by Maugham on 20th of April 1946 in Coolidge Auditorium, The Library of Congress, on the occasion of his presenting the original manuscript of Of Human Bondage to the Library of Congress. This is actually reprinted in A Traveller in Romance (1984); see C. 2.

D. 12. Writing for Love or Money, ed. Norman Cousins, New York, Longmans, Green, 1949. Contains “How I Write Short Stories” by Maugham. Most probably this is the preface to East and West (see F. 2.) which also appeared in Saturday Review of Literature on 28 July 1934; see E. 6.

D. 13. Essays by Divers Hands. Transactions of the Royal Society of Literature of United Kingdom, vol. 25. London, Oxford University Press, MCML. Contains “The Short Story” by Maugham. This is perhaps the 26pp Introduction to East and West, the first volume of the American edition of The Complete Short Stories (F. 2.), first published separately in 1934, also under the English title Altogether. The Introduction itself was also published in Nash's Magazine in October 1934 and it was reprinted in Selected Prefaces and Introductions (1963); see F. 7.

D. 14. The Writer's Point of View. Pamphlet, Cambridge University Press, 1951. Ninth Annual Lecture of National Book League given by Maugham in Kingsway Hall on 24.10.1951.

D. 15. Robert Ross: Friend of Friends by Margery Ross. London, J. Cape, 1952. Letters of Maugham to Robert Ross, pp. 157, 203.

D. 16. Speech by W. Somerset Maugham. Given on opening the exhibition of Authors as Artists at the Army & Navy Stores, 15 October 1956. London, Army & Navy Stores Ltd., 1956. A talk on ''authors who have to a greater or lesser extent occupied themselves with graphic arts'' with reflections on Max Beerbohm, Gordon Craig, Lawrence Whistler, D. H. Lawrence and Noel Coward (2 pp).

D. 17. The Cassell Miscellany. (London) Cassell & Co. Ltd., 1958. Contains the original version of “The Mother”, reprinted from Story Teller, April 1909; see E. 1. The slightly revised later version appears in Creatures of Circumstance (1947); see A. 2. 9.

D. 18. Purely for My Pleasure. Heinemann, 1962. Art album of Maugham's picture collection with short commentaries by him how he happened to acquire these canvases.


E. CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICALS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
NB. Doubtful pieces or such that have never appeared in any of his books or in Seventeen Lost Stories (C. 1.) and A Traveller in Romance (C. 2.).

E. 0. 1. ''A Really Nice Story: A Short Tale'', Black & White, Nov. 30, 1901, pp. 768-769.

E. 0. 2. ''The Image of the Virgin: A Short Story'', Black & White, Dec. 14, 1901, pp. 840-842.

E. 0. 3. ''The Criminal'', Lloyd's Weekly News, July 31, 1904, p. 14.

E. 0. 4. "The Course of True Love", The Woman at Home, August 1904. Jack Adrian mentions this short story in his introduction to The Ash-Tree Press Annual Macabre 1998, but otherwise the piece is a complete mystery. No reference to it in Raymond Toole Stott's bibliography or anywhere else in the literature on Maugham. Possibly, if not very probably, it is an alternative title to "Flirtation", written in 1904 but first published in 1906, later reprinted in Seventeen Lost Stories (1968).

E. 1. ''The Mother''. Story Teller, April 1909. Original version of the short story in Creatures of Circumstance (1947); see A. 2. 9. A rare case when Maugham was satisfied enough with an early work as to revise it only slightly 40 years or so later. The original version also appeared in book form, The Cassell Miscellany (1958); see D. 17. 

E. 2. “The Woman Who Wouldn't Take a Hint”. Cosmopolitan, April 1924. As it turned out, this is an alternative title of the short story “Mabel”, published as such in The Complete Short Stories (1951, F. 1.), but as a nameless chapter it appeared as early as 1930 in The Gentleman in the Parlour; see A. 3. 3.

E. 3. “Advice to a Young Author”. New York Times, 2 March 1927.

E. 4. “Through the Jungle”. Britannia and Eve, July and August 1929. With photographs illustrating the articles by Gerald Haxton. Probably familiar excerpts from either A Writer's Notebook (1949) or The Gentleman in the Parlour (1930), A. 4. 7. and A. 3. 3. respectively.

E. 5. “Maugham Discusses Drama”. The Living Age, May 1931.

E. 6.How I Write Short Stories”. Saturday Review of Literature, 28 July 1934. This is actually a reprint, with minor alternations, of the preface to East and West, the first volume of First American Edition of The Complete Short Stories. See F. 2.

E. 7.W. Somerset Maugham discusses the Cinema”. Film Weekly, November 19, 1938.

E. 8. “The Professional Writer”. Sat. Rev. of Lit., 29 January 1938. Extract from The Summing Up, probably with promotional purpose as the book was published just a few weeks earlier (January 6, 1938). Stott gives a wrong year (“1939”). Part 1. Part 2. Thanks to My W. Somerset Maugham Collection.

E. 9. “Give Me a Murder”. Sat. Eve. Post, 28 December 1940.

E. 10. “What Tomorrow Holds”. Redbook, January 1941.

E. 11. “They are Strange People”. Redbook, February 1941.

E. 12. “In Defence of Who-done-its”. Scholastic, 25 May 1945.

E. 13. “Function of the Writer”. Writer, 25 May 1946.

E. 14. “What Should a Novel Do?”. Scholastic, 3 March 1947.

E. 15. “Ten Best Sellers”. Good Housekeeping, September 1948. Probably some excerpts from Great Novelists and Their Novels (1948, A. 4. 6.) or the Introductions in the Atlantic Monthly. See H. 4.

E. 16. “I'm Glad To Be Old”. English Digest, International Edition, April 1951.

E. 17. “The Bidding Started Slowly”. The Connoisseur, June 1952.

E. 18. “On the Approach of Middle Age”. Vogue, 15 November 1960. This is highly unlikely to have been written anew since Maugham was 84 years old and hardly “approaching the middle age” when it was published. Probably it is reprint of the much earlier article with the same name that appeared in Vanity Fair in 1923 and is also included in A Traveller in Romance (1984). See C. 2.

E. 19. “Looking Back”. Show (N. Y.), June-August 1962. Reprinted, Sunday Express, September to 28 October 1962. Maugham's notorious memoirs, partly serialised in magazines but never published in book form in their entirety.

E. 20. “The Wisdom of W. S. Maugham”. Playboy, January 1966. It is doubtful that this piece was written by Maugham as John Whitehead mentions in the preface to A Traveller in Romance (C. 2.).


F. IMPORTANT COLLECTED EDITIONS
OF WORKS BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM

F. 1. The Complete Short Stories, Heinemann, 1951, 3 vols.
Reprinted, 1952. Contains 91 short stories: 84 from all collections but Orientations (A. 2. 2. to A. 2. 9.) and 7 pieces from the travel books: two from On A Chinese Screen (A. 3. 2.) five from The Gentleman in the Parlour (A. 3. 3.). Maugham also wrote a new Preface to each volume and arranged the order in which the stories appear.

F. 2. The Complete Short Stories, Doubleday, 1952, 2 vols.
First American Edition. Reprinted by The Reprint Society, 1954. The same 91 short stories as in the Heinemann edition above, but with completely different Prefaces. Vol. 1 is called East and West, was first published in 1934, also under the English title Altogether, and contains a new 26 pp preface on the art of short story. Vol. 2 is called The World Over, was first published in 1952, and contains a new 8 pp preface. Both prefaces are reprinted in Selected Prefaces and Introductions (1963); see F. 7.

F. 3. The Collected Plays, Heinemann, 1952, 3 vols.
Contain 18 plays and a new Preface to each volume. First published in 1931-34 in 6 vols., as a beginning of The Collected Edition. The plays in the 1952 edition are identical, the prefaces were only slightly adjusted. See also B. 6-9., 11., 13-15., 17-21., 24. & 26-29.
I. Lady Frederick – Mrs. Dot – Jack Straw – Penelope – Smith – The Land of Promise.
II. Our Betters – The Unattainable – Home and Beauty – The Circle – The Constant Wife – The Breadwinner.
III. Caesar’s Wife – East of Suez – The Sacred Flame – The Unknown – For Services Rendered – Sheppey.

F. 4. The Selected Novels, Heinemann, 1953, 3 vols.
Contain 9 novels and a new Preface to each volume. See also A. 1. 1., 10-16 & 18.
I. Liza of Lambeth – Cakes and Ale – Theatre
II. The Moon and Sixpence – The Narrow Corner – The Painted Veil
III. Christmas Holiday – Up at the Villa – The Razor's Edge

F. 5. The Partial View, Heinemann, 1954.
Contains The Summing Up (A. 4. 2.) and A Writer's Notebook (A. 4. 7.) in one volume with a new Preface.

F. 6. The Travel Books, Heinemann, 1955.
Contains On a Chinese Screen (A. 3. 2.), The Gentleman in the Parlour (A. 3. 3.), Don Fernando (A. 4. 1.) in one volume with a new Preface.

F. 7. Selected Prefaces and Introductions, Doubleday, 1963.
Reprinted by Heinemann, 1964. Contains, among other things, the prefaces to both Vol. 1 East and West (26 pp) and Vol. 2 The World Over (8 pp) of the American Edition of The Complete Short Stories (1952, F. 2.).
Contents:
CONCERNING MR. MAUGHAM'S OWN WORKS
1. The Art of Fiction from Ten Novels and their Authors (1954)
2. Preface to A Writer's Notebook (1949)
3. Foreword to Of Human Bondage (1915)*
4. Excerpt from the Preface to Vol. III of The Collected Plays (1931)
5. Prefaces to both volumes of the American edition of The Complete Short Stories
- vol. 1 East and West (1921-1952)
- vol. 2 The World Over (1922-1952)
CONCERNING THE WORKS OF OTHER WRITERS
1. General Introduction to Traveller's Library (1933)
2. Introduction to Tellers of Tales (1939)
3. Introduction to A Choice of Kipling's Prose (1952)
* This is incorrect. Of Human Bondage was first published in 1915 but without any preface; see A. 1. 9. 1. The Foreword reprinted here was written in 1936 for the First Illustrated Edition published by Doubleday; see A. 1. 9. 4.

F. 8. Collected Short Stories, 4 vols.
The same 91 short stories as above (F. 1-2.). The order is slightly modified, the prefaces are virtually the same as in the definitive Heinemann edition from 1951. Published numerous times: Penguin, 1963; Mandarin, 1990; Vintage, 2000-2002, to name but a few.

F. 9. The Maugham Reader, Doubleday, 1950.
With Introduction by Glenway Wescott and Frontispiece portrait of portrait by Graham Sutherland. Pagination: xxxvi+1217 pp. [Stott]. Contains 2 novels, 2 plays, 14 short stories, 1 essay and the complete The Summing Up (1938), all previously published but some under very different titles:
The Painted Veil – Jane – The Opium Addict – The Facts of Life – Rain – The Treasure – The Outstation – The French Governor – Our Betters – The Summing Up – The Constant Wife – Red – A String of Beads – The Door of Opportunity – September's Bird – The Alien Corn – The Round Dozen – The Vessel of Wrath – Christmas Holiday – El Greco

“September's Bird”, “The Opium Addict” and “The French Governor” are alternative titles of “Princess September”, “Mirage” and “A Marriage of Convenience”, respectively; the latter can be found in The Complete Short Stories editions as well, occasionally with very slight textual changes; all three stories also appeared in The Gentleman in the Parlour (1930), as chapters XXXII, XLIII and XXXIV, respectively. So far as can currently be ascertained, the alternative titles in The Maugham Reader were never used before or since in any other volume with Maugham's works. [Thanks a lot, Daniel! :-)]

“El Greco” is a reprint from Don Fernando (1935; Revised, 1950). The version here was most probably taken from the revised edition.

F. 10. Mr. Maugham Himself, Doubleday, 1954.
Selected and with Introduction by John Beecroft. Pagination: xxxvi+688 pp. [Stott]. Contains 1 novel, 2 short stories, 2 essays, excerpts from A Writer's Notebook (1949) and the complete The Summing Up (1938), all previously published:
Of Human Bondage – Some Novelists I Have Known – Mr Harrington's Washing – The Book Bag – El Greco – The Summing Up – Excerpts from ''A Writer's Notebook''.

The so called ''Excerpts from A Writer's Notebook'' are actually the two postscripts that Maugham wrote in 1944 and 1949; both are of course part of the original edition of the book. Remarkably, this reprinting of The Summing Up contains a unique postscript which is actually a condensed version of Maugham's preface for The Partial View (1954). [Thank you, Daniel!]


G. THE COLLECTED EDITION OF W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM
Published by Heinemann, 1934–1969.
G. 1. Liza of Lambeth (1934, New Preface, 21pp.*°)
G. 2. Cakes and Ale (1934, New Preface, 6pp.*°)
G. 3. The Narrow Corner (1934, New Preface, 4pp.*°)
G. 4. The Painted Veil (1934, New Preface, 5pp.*°)
G. 5. Ashenden (1934, New Preface, 6pp.*°)
G. 6. On a Chinese Screen (1935, New Preface, 4pp.°)
G. 7. The Gentleman in the Parlour (1935, New Preface, 4pp.*°)
G. 8. The Moon and Sixpence (1935, New Preface, 4pp.°)
G. 9. The Trembling of a Leaf (1935, New Preface, 4pp.**°)
G. 10. The Casuarina Tree (1935, the original preface!)
G. 11. Ah King (1936, New Preface, 6pp.°)
G. 12. First Person Singular (1936, New Preface, 5pp.°)
G. 13. Of Human Bondage (1937, see A. 1. 9. 5)
G. 14. Mrs Craddock (1937, see A. 1. 4. 4.)
G. 15. Don Fernando (1937, see A. 4. 1.)
G. 16. Cosmopolitans (1938, the original Preface!)
G. 17. Theatre (1939, New Preface, 7pp.*)
G. 18. Christmas Holiday (1941)
G. 19. The Summing Up (1948)
G. 20. The Razor's Edge (1948)
G. 21. Catalina (1948)
G. 22. Creatures of Circumstance (1950)
G. 23. A Writer's Notebook (1951)
G. 24. The Magician (1956, “A Fragment of Autobiography”*)
G. 25. Then and Now (1959)
G. 26. Up At the Villa (????)
G. 27. The Explorer (1967)
G. 28. Merry-Go-Round (1969)
* Prefaces reprinted in Vintage Classics, Paperback, 1999-2001.
** Reprinted in Heron, 1968. See A. 2. 2. 4.
°Reprinted in the Pocket Edition, Heinemann, 1936-1938.


H. BOOKS EDITED BY W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM

H. 1. The Traveller's Library. Doubleday Doran, 1933. Reprinted the same year as Fifty Modern English Writers. Compilation, 11pp Introduction and Notes by Maugham. Contents.

H. 2. Tellers of Tales. 100 Short Stories From the United States, England, France, Russia and Germany. Doubleday Doran, 1939. Reprinted in 1943 as The Greatest Stories of All Times. Selection and 27pp Introduction by Maugham. Contents.

H. 3. Great Modern Reading. Introduction to Modern English and American Literature. Nelson Doubleday, 1943. Reprinted the same year as Introduction to Modern English and American Literature. Selection, 9pp Introduction and commentaries by Maugham. Contents.

H. 4. The Ten Best Novels in the World, John C. Winston, 1948-49, 10 vols.
H. 4. 1. The History of Tom Jones by Henry Fielding
H. 4. 2. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
H. 4. 3.  Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
H. 4. 4. Old Man Goriot by Honore de Balzac
H. 4. 5. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
H. 4. 6. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
H. 4. 7. The Red and the Black by Stendhal
H. 4. 8. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
H. 4. 9. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
H. 4. 10. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
Abridged and with Introduction by Maugham. Nine of these introductory essays appeared in the Atlantic Monthly between November 1947 and July 1948. All ten were published by Winston in 1948 as Great Novelists and Their Novels (A. 4. 6.), later expanded into Ten Novels and Their Authors (A. 4. 6a.), first published by Heinemann in 1954. See also E. 15.

H. 5. A Choice of Kipling's Prose. Macmillan & Co., 1952. Also published by Doubleday in 1953 as Maugham's Choice of Kipling's Best. Selection and 20pp or so introductory Essay by Maugham. Contents.




1 comment:

  1. Hi Alexander, I'm looking for the 1935 (and 1937) preface (actually called 'Instead of a Preface) for Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham, but I'm having trouble getting my hands on that edition of the book. I noticed you have some fairly extensive quotes from 'Instead of a preface' and was wondering if you had a copy of the full text? Feel free to contact me at elizabeth.louise.king@gmail.com if you can point me in the right direction! Cheers.

    ReplyDelete