Tuesday, 19 November 2013

Bertrand Russell: A Very Short Bibliography [Section I.1-29.]

I.       BOOKS and COLLECTIONS by BERTRAND RUSSELL
                    I.1.    German Social Democracy (1896)
                                                     i.  London: Longmans, Green, 1896. Preface by BR. Appendix by Alys Russell. Six lectures delivered at the London School of Economics and Political Science, February and March 1896.
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1965. New preface by BR. Omits the Appendix. Reprinted by Simon & Schuster, 1965.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
  NB. Compressed ToC. For further details, see here.
·      I. Marx and the Theoretic Basis of Social Democracy
·      II. Lassalle
·      III. History of German Socialism from the Death of Lassalle to the Passing of the Exceptional Law, 1878
·      IV. Social Democracy under the Exceptional Law, 1878-1890
·      V. Organisation, Agitation, Tactics, and Programme of Social Democracy since the Fall of the Socialist Law
·      VI. The Present Position of Social Democracy
                    I.2.    An Essay on the Foundations of Geometry (1897)
                                                     i.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1897. Preface by BR, “Haslemere. May, 1897.
                                                   ii.  Dover, 1956. Reprint of the 1st ed. Foreword by Prof. Morris Kline.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
NB. The original TOC is further divided into 209 sections with very long titles. For more details, see the copy from Internet Archive here (loading may take a while).
·      Introduction. Problem Defined by its Relation to Logic, Psychology and Mathematics
·      Chapter I. A Short History of Metageometry.
·      Chapter II. Critical Account of Some Previous Philosophical Theories of Geometry.
·      Chapter III.
a.       Section A. The Axioms of Projecting Geometry.
b.       Section B. The Axioms of Metrical Geometry.
                                                                                                                                      i.      The Axiom of Free Mobility
                                                                                                                                    ii.      The Axiom of Dimensions
                                                                                                                                  iii.      The Axiom of Distance
·      Chapter IV. Philosophical Consequences
                    I.3.    A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz (1900)
                                                     i.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900. Preface by BR signed “September, 1900”. With an Appendix of Leading Passages.
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, November 1937. Preface to the Second Edition by BR.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
Chapter I. Leibniz’s Premisses
·      1. Reasons why Leibniz never wrote a magnum opus
·      2. Functions of the commentator on Leibniz
·      3. Two types of inconsistency in his philosophy
·      4. His premisses
·      5. Course of the present work
·      6. Influences which formed Leibniz's opinions
Chapter II. Necessary Propositions and the Law of Contradictions
·      7. Leibniz's philosophy begins with an analysis of propositions
·      8. Outline of Leibniz's logical argument
·      9. Questions raised by this argument
·      10. Are all propositions reducible to the subject-predicate form?
·      11. Analytic and synthetic propositions
·      12. Necessity and contingency
Chapter III. Contingent Propositions and the Law of Sufficient Reason
·      13. The range of contingent judgments in Leibniz
·      14. Meaning of the principle of sufficient reason
·      15. Its relation to the law of contradiction
Chapter IV. The Conception of Substance
·      16. Cartesian and Spinozistic views on substance
·      17. The meaning of substance in Leibniz
·      18. The meaning of activity
·      19. Connection between activity and sufficient reason
·      20. The states of one substance form one causal series
·      21. How does a substance differ from the sum of its predicates?
·      22. Relation of time to Leibniz's notion of substance
Chapter V. The Identity of Indiscernibles and the Law of Continuity. Possibility and Compossibility
·      23. Meaning of the Identity of Indiscernibles
·      24. The principle necessary, but not a premiss of Leibniz's philosophy
·      25. Is Leibniz's proof of the principle valid?
·      26. Every substance has an infinite number of predicates. Connection of this with contingency and with the identity of indiscernibles
·      27. The Law of Continuity : three forms of continuity maintained by Leibniz
·      28. Grounds of the Law of Continuity
·      29. Possibility and compossibility
·      30. Common properties of all possible worlds
·      31. The three kinds of necessity
Chapter VI. Why did Leibniz Believe in an External World?
·      32. Leibniz accepted matter as a datum
·      33. The existence of the external world has only "moral certainty"
Chapter VII. The Philosophy of Matter: (a) as the Outcome of the Principles of Dynamics
·      34. The general trustworthiness of perception is a premiss of Leibniz's philosophy
·      35. Various meanings of matter and body
·      36. Relation of Leibnizian and Cartesian Dynamics
·      37. The essence of matter is not extension .
·      38. Meaning of materia prima in Leibniz's Dynamics
·      39. Materia secunda
·      40. The conception of force and the law of inertia
·      41. Force and absolute motion
·      42. Metaphysical grounds for assuming force
·      4.3. Dynamical argument for plurality of causal series
·      44. Three types of dynamical theory confused by Leibniz
·      45. His grounds against extended atoms
·      46. Against the vacuum
·      47. And against action at a distance
·      48. Force as conferring individuality
·      49. Primitive and derivative force
·      50. Antinomy of dynamical causation
Chapter VIII. The Philosophy of Matter (continued), (b) as Explaining Continuity and Extension
·      51. There must be simple substances, since there are compounds
·      52. Extension, as distinguished from space, is Leibniz's starting point
·      53. Extension means repetition
·      54. Hence the essence of a substance cannot be extension, since a substance must be a true unity
·      55. The three kinds of point. Substances not material
·      56. Motion is phenomenal, though force is real
Chapter IX. The Labyrinth of the Continuum
·      57. Difficulties about points
·      58. Assertion of the actual infinite and denial of infinite number
·      59. Continuity in one sense denied by Leibniz
·      60. In number, space, and time, the whole is prior to the part
·      61. Space and time, for Leibniz, purely relational
·      62. Summary of the argument from the continuum to monads
·      63. Since aggregates are phenomenal, there is not really a number of monads
·      64. Difficulties of this view
Chapter X. The Theory of Space and Time and its Relation to Monadism
·      65. Reasons why a philosophy of substance must deny the reality of space
·      66. Leibniz's arguments against the reality of space
·      67. Leibniz's theory of position
·      68. The relation of monads to space a fundamental difficulty of monadism
·      69. Leibniz's early views on this subject
·      70. His middle views
·      71. His later views
·      72. Time and change
·      73. Monadisms take an unsymmetrical view of the relations of space and of time to things
·      74. Leibniz held confusedly to an objective counterpart of space and time
Chapter XI. The Nature of Monads in General
·      75. Perception
·      76. Appetition
·      77. Perception not due to action of the perceived on the percipient
·      78. Lotze's criticism of this view
·      79. The pre-established harmony
Chapter XII. Soul and Body
·      80. Relations of monads to be henceforth considered
·      81. Cartesian and Spinozistic views of the relations of Soul and Body
·      82. Outline of Leibniz's view
·      83. The three classes of monads
·      84. Activity and passivity
·      85. Perfection and clearness of perception
·      86. Materia prima as an element in each monad
·      87. Materia prima the source of finitude, plurality, and matter
·      88. And of the interconnection of monads
·      89. Two theories of soul and body in Leibniz
·      90. First theory
·      91. Second theory
·      92. The vinculum substantiale
·      93. The second theory to be rejected
·      94. Preformation
Chapter XIII. Confused and Unconscious Perception
·      95. Two kinds of differences between monads
·      96. Unconscious mental states
·      97. Confused and minute perceptions
Chapter XIV. Leibniz's Theory of Knowledge
·      98. What theory of knowledge means
·      99. Innate ideas and truths
·      100. The New Essays inconsistent with Leibniz's metaphysics
·      101. Difficulties as to innate ideas
·      102. Distinction of sense and intellect
·      103. The quality of ideas
·      104. Definition
·      105. The Characteristica Universalis
Chapter XV. Proofs of the Existence of God
·      106. Four proofs allowed by Leibniz
·      107. The ontological argument
·      108. Proof that the idea of God is possible
·      109. The cosmological argument 175
·      110. Objections to this argument 176
·      111. The argument from the eternal truths
·      112. Its weakness
·      113. Relation of knowledge to truth
·      114. Argument from the pre-established harmony
·      115. Objections to this argument
·      116. Inconsistencies resulting from Leibniz's belief in God
·      117. God's goodness
Chapter XVI. Leibniz’s Ethics
·      118. Freedom and determinism
·      119. Psychology of volition and pleasure
·      120. Sin
·      121. Meaning of good and evil: three kinds of each
·      122. Metaphysical evil the source of the other two kinds
·      123. Connection with the doctrine of analytic judgments
·      124. The kingdoms of nature and of grace
                    I.4.    The Principles of Mathematics (1903)
                                                     i.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1903. Preface by BR, London, December, 1902.”
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1937. Introduction to the Second Edition by BR.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
  NB. For a more detailed ToC, see here (loading may take a while).
Part I. The Indefinables of Mathematics
·      1. Definition of Pure Mathematics
·      2. Symbolic Logic [III.4., excerpt]
                                                                                                  a.    The Propositional Calculus
                                                                                                  b.    The Calculus of Classes
                                                                                                  c.    The Calculus of Relations
                                                                                                  d.    Peano’s Symbolic Logic
·      3. Implication and Formal Implication
·      4. Proper Names, Adjectives and Verbs
·      5. Denoting
·      6. Classes
·      7. Propositional Functions
·      8. Variables
·      9. Relations
·      10. The Contradiction
Part II. Number
·      11. Definition of Cardinal Numbers
·      12. Addition and Multiplication
·      13. Finite and Infinite
·      14. Theory of Finite Numbers
·      15. Addition of Terms and Addition of Classes
·      16. Whole and Part
·      17. Infinite Wholes
·      18. Ratios and Fractions
Part III. Quantity
·      19. The Meaning of Magnitude
·      20. The Range of Quantity
·      21. Numbers as Expressing Magnitude: Measurement
·      22. Zero
·      23. Infinity, the Infinitesimal, and Continuity
Part IV. Order
·      24. The Genesis of Series
·      25. The Meaning of Order
·      26. Asymmetrical Relations
·      27. Difference of Sense and Difference of Sign
·      28. On the Difference between Open and Closed Series
·      29. Progressions and Ordinal Numbers
·      30. Dedekind’s Theory of Number
·      31. Distance
Part V. Infinity and Continuity
·      32. The Correlation of Series
·      33. Real Numbers
·      34. Limits and Irrational Numbers
·      35. Cantor’s First Definition of Continuity
·      36. Ordinal Continuity
·      37. Transfinite Cardinals
·      38. Transfinite Ordinals
·      39. The Infinitesimal Calculus
·      40. The Infinitesimal and the Improper Infinite
·      41. Philosophical Arguments Concerning the Infinitesimal
·      42. The Philosophy of the Continuum
·      43. The Philosophy of the Infinite
Part VI. Space
·      44. Dimensions and Complex Numbers
·      45. Projective Geometry
·      46. Descriptive Geometry
·      47. Metrical Geometry
·      48. Relation of Metrical to Projective and Descriptive Geometry
·      49. Definition of Various Spaces
·      50. The Continuity of Space
·      51. Logical Arguments against Points
·      52. Kant’s Theory of Space
Part VII. Matter and Motion
·      53. Matter
·      54. Motion
·      55. Causality
·      56. Definition of a Dynamical World
·      57. Newton’s Laws of Motion
·      58. Absolute and Relative Motion
·      59. Hertz’s Dynamics
·      Appendix A: The Logical and Arithmetical Doctrines of Frege
·      Appendix B: The Doctrine of Types
                    I.5.    Philosophical Essays (1910)
                                                     i.  London: Longmans, Green, November 1910. Preface by BR, “July 1910”.
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, July 1966. Rev. ed. New preface by BR.
                                                 iii.  Routledge Classics, 2009. Rev. ed. (1966). Two prefaces by BR (1910, 1966).
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      The Elements of Ethics [1908, II.14.]
·      The Free Man’s Worship [not in the rev. ed.; 1903, II.3.]
·      The Study of Mathematics [not in the rev. ed.; 1907, II.11.]
·      On History [only in the rev. ed.; 1904, II.4.]
·      Science and Hypothesis (A Review) [only in the rev. ed.; 1905, II.5.]
·      Pragmatism [1909, II.18.]
·      Williams James's Conception of Truth [1908, II.14.]
·      The Monistic Theory of Truth [1907, II.12.]
·      On the Nature of Truth and Falsehood [1909, II.17.]
                    I.6.    Principia Mathematica (1910-13), 3 vols.
                                                     i.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1910-13, 3 vols. Preface by the authors (vol. 1).
                                                   ii.  Cambridge University Press, 1927. 2nd ed. Introduction to the Second Edition by the authors (vol. 1).
                                                 iii.  Contents:
   NB. Compressed ToC. For further details, see here: vol.1, vol.2, vol.3.
Volume I
·      Introduction
·      Part I. Mathematical Logic
                                                                                                 A.    The Theory of Deduction
                                                                                                 B.    Theory of Apparent Variables
                                                                                                C.    Classes and Relations
                                                                                                D.    Logic and Relations
                                                                                                 E.    Products and Sums of Classes
·      Part II. Prolegomena to Cardinal Arithmetic
                                                                                                 A.    Unit Classes and Couples
                                                                                                 B.    Sub-Classes, Sub-Relations, and Relative Types
                                                                                                C.    One-Many, Many-One, and One-One Relations
                                                                                                D.    Selections
                                                                                                 E.    Inductive Relations
·      Appendix A: The Theory of Deduction for Propositions containing Apparent Variables
·      Appendix B: Mathematical Induction
·      Appendix C: Truth-Functions and others
Volume II
·      Part III. Cardinal Arithmetic
                                                                                                 A.    Definition and Logical Properties of Cardinal Numbers
                                                                                                 B.    Addition, Multiplication and Exponentiation
                                                                                                C.    Finite and Infinite
·      Part IV. Relation-Arithmetic
                                                                                                 A.    Ordinal Similarity and Relation-Numbers
                                                                                                 B.    Addition of Relations, and the product of two relations
                                                                                                C.    The Principle of First Differences, and the multiplication and exponentiation of relations
                                                                                                D.    Arithmetic of Relation-Numbers
·      Part V. Series
                                                                                                 A.    General Theory of Series
                                                                                                 B.    On Sections, Segments, Stretches, and Derivatives
                                                                                                C.    On Convergence, and the Limits of Functions
Volume III
·      Part V. Series (continued)
                                                                                                D.    Well-ordered Series
                                                                                                 E.    Finite and Infinite Series and Ordinals
                                                                                                 F.    Compact Series, Rational Series, and Continuous Series
·      Part VI. Quantity
                                                                                                 A.    Generalization of Number
                                                                                                 B.    Vector-Families
                                                                                                C.    Measurement
                                                                                                D.    Cyclic Families
                    I.7.    The Problems of Philosophy (1912)
                                                     i.  London: Williams and Norgate, 1912. Preface by BR. Bibliographical Note.
                                                   ii.  London: Oxford University Press, 1912.
                                                 iii.  New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1912.
                                                 iv.  Dover, 1999. Reprints the 1st ed.
                                                   v.  Contents:
·      I. Appearance and Reality
·      II. The Existence of Matter
·      III. The Nature of Matter
·      IV. Idealism
·      V. Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description [III.4.]
·      VI. On Induction [III.4.]
·      VII. On Our Knowledge of General Principles
·      VIII. How A Priori Knowledge is Possible
·      IX. The World of Universals
·      X. On Our Knowledge of Universals
·      XI. On Intuitive Knowledge
·      XII. Truth and Falsehood
·      XIII. Knowledge, Error, and Probable Opinion
·      XIV. The Limits of Philosophical Knowledge
·      XV. The Value of Philosophy
                    I.8.    Our Knowledge of the External World as a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy (1914)
                                                     i.  Chicago: Open Court, 1914. Preface by BR signed “Cambridge, June 1914”. Delivered as Lowell Lectures in Boston, March and April 1914.
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1926. Rev. ed.
                                                 iii.  Routledge, 1993. Original 1914 text. Introduction by John G. Slater, 1993.  1995, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2005.
                                                 iv.  Routledge Classics, 2009. Original 1914 text. Introduction by John G. Slater, 1993.
                                                   v.  Contents:
·      I. Current Tendencies [ III.1.; see also II.26.]
·      II. Logic as the Essence of Philosophy
·      III. On our Knowledge of the External World
·      IV. The World of Physics and the World of Sense
·      V. The Theory of Continuity
·      VI. The Problem of Infinity Considered Historically
·      VII. The Positive Theory of Infinity
·      VIII. On the Notion of Cause, with Applications to the Free-Will problem
                    I.9.    Justice in War-Time (1915)
                                                     i.  London: National Labour Press, 1915. Preface by BR.
                                                   ii.  Chicago: Open Court, 1916. 2nd rev. ed. Publisher's Preface to the Second Edition signed “March 1917”. Author's Preface to the First Edition signed “November 1915”. All essays are reprinted in IV.13.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
·      An Appeal to the Intellectuals of Europe [1915]
·      The Ethics of War [January, 1915, Int. J of Ethics, vol. XXV, No. 2.]
·      War and Non-Resistance [1915]
·      Why Nations Love War [1914]
·      The Future of Anglo-German Rivalry [1915]
·      Is a Permanent Peace Possible? [1915]
·      The Danger of Civilization [rev. ed. only; 1916]
·      The Entente Policy, 1904-1915. A Reply to Professor Gilbert Murray [1915]
                                                                                                        i.    Introduction
                                                                                                      ii.    Morrocco
                                                                                                    iii.    The Anglo-Russian Entente
                                                                                                     iv.    What Our Policy Ought to Have Been
·      Appendix A
·      Appendix B
               I.10.    Principles of Social Reconstruction (1916)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, November 1916. Preface by BR dated “September 1916”. Lectures delivered in the beginning of 1916 at Caxton Hall in Westminster.
                                                   ii.  New York: The Century Co., January 1917(?), as Why Men Fight: A Method of Abolishing the International Duel.
                                                 iii.  Routledge Classics, 2010, as Why Men Fight. Introduction by Richard A. Rempel.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      I. The Principle of Growth
·      II. The State [III.1.]
·      III. War as an Institution
·      IV. Property [III.4.]
·      V. Education [III.1. & III.4.]
·      VI. Marriage and the Population Question [III.12.]
·      VII. Religion and the Churches [II.31.]
·      VIII. What We Can Do
               I.11.    Political Ideals (1917)
                                                     i.  New York: The Century Co., September 1917.
                                                   ii.  Simon & Schuster, 1964. Foreword by BR, 1963.   
                                                 iii.  Contents ( IV.14.):
·      I. Political Ideals [1916]
·      II. Capitalism and the Wage System [1917]
·      III. Pitfalls in Socialism [1917]
·      IV. Individual Liberty and Public Control [1917]
·      V. National Independence and Internationalism [1917]
               I.12.    Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays (1917)
                                                     i.  London: Longmans, Green, ???
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, December 1917. 11th impression, 1959. Preface by BR, signed “London, September 1917”.
                                                 iii.  New York: Simon & Schuster, 1929.
                                                 iv.  Routledge, 1994. Two prefaces by BR (1917, 1929). Introduction by John G. Slater, 1994.
                                                   v.  Contents:
·      A Free Man's Worship [1903, II.3.]
·      Mysticism and Logic [1914, II.26.]
·      The Place of Science in a Liberal Education [1913, II.25.]
·      The Study of Mathematics [1907, II.11.]
·      Mathematics and the Metaphysicians
·      On Scientific Method in Philosophy [1914, II.27.]
·      The Ultimate Constituents of Matter [1915, II.30.]
·      The Relation to Sense-data to Physics [1914, II.28.]
·      On the Notion of Cause [1912, II.24.]
·      Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description [1911, II.20.]
               I.13.    Roads to Freedom: Socialism, Anarchism and Syndicalism (1918)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, November 1918.
                                                   ii.  George Allen & Unwin, July 1919. 2nd rev. ed. New preface by BR, “London, January, 1919”.
                                                 iii.  New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1919, as Proposed Roads to Freedom: Socialism, Anarchism and Syndicalism.
                                                 iv.  George Allen & Unwin, January 1920. 3rd ed.
                                                   v.  George Allen and Unwin, 1949. 3rd ed. 9th impr. Preface [to the 2nd ed.] by BR, “January 1919”. Preface to Third Edition by BR, “June 1948”.
                                                 vi.  Routledge, 1993. Preface [to the 2nd ed.] by BR signed “January 1919”. Preface to Third Edition by BR, “June 1948”.
                                               vii.  Contents:
·      Introduction
PART I: Historical
·      I. Marx and the Socialist Doctrine
·      II. Bakunin and Anarchism
·      III. The Syndicalist Revolt
PART II: Problems of the Future
·      IV. Work and Pay
·      V. Government and Law
·      VI. International Relations
·      VII. Science and Art Under Socialism [III.1.]
·      VIII. The World as it Could be Made [III.1.]
               I.14.    Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy (1919)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, May 1919. Preface by BR. Editor’s Note.
                                                   ii.  New York: The Macmillan, 1919.
                                                 iii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, April 1920. 2nd ed.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      1. The Series of Natural Numbers
·      2. Definition of Number [III.1.]
·      3. Finitude and Mathematical Induction
·      4. The Definition of Order
·      5. Kinds of Relations
·      6. Similarity of Relations
·      7. Rational, Real, and Complex Numbers
·      8. Infinite Cardinal Numbers
·      9. Infinite Series and Ordinals
·      10. Limits and Continuity
·      11. Limits and Continuity of Functions
·      12. Selections and the Multiplicative Axiom
·      13. The Axiom of Infinity and Logical Types
·      14. Incompatibility and the Theory of Deduction
·      15. Propositional Functions
·      16. Descriptions
·      17. Classes
·      18. Mathematics and Logic
               I.15.    The Practice and Theory of Bolshevism (1920)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1920. Preface by BR signed “September 1920”.
                                                   ii.  Contents:
Part I. The Present Condition in Russia
·      I. What is Hoped from Bolshevism
·      II. General Characteristics
·      III. Lenin, Trotsky and Gorky
·      IV. Art and Education
·      V. Communism and the Soviet Constitution
·      VI. The Failure of Russian Industry
·      VII. Daily Life in Moscow
·      VIII. Town and Country
·      IX. International Policy
Part II. Bolshevik Theory
·      I. The Materialistic Theory of History [III.4.]
·      II. Deciding Forces in Politics [III.1.]
·      III. Bolshevik Criticism of Democracy
·      IV. Revolution and Dictatorship
·      V. Mechanism and the Individual
·      VI. Why Russian Communism Has Failed
·      VII. Conditions for the Success of Communism
               I.16.    The Analysis of Mind (1921)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1921. Preface by BR signed “Peking, January 1921”.  
                                                   ii.  New York: The Macmillan, 1921.
                                                 iii.  Routledge, 2002. Introduction by Thomas Baldwin, 1995.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      I. Recent Criticisms of “Consciousness”
·      II. Instinct and Habit
·      III. Desire and Feeling
·      IV. Influences of Past History on Present Occurrences in Living Organisms
·      V. Psychological and Physical Causal Laws [III.4.]
·      VI. Introspection
·      VII. The Definition of Perception
·      VIII. Sensation and Images
·      IX. Memory
·      X. Words and Meaning [III.1.]
·      XI. General Ideas and Thought
·      XII. Belief
·      XIII. Truth and Falsehood [III.4.]
·      XIV. Emotions and Will
·      XV. Characteristics of Mental Phenomena
               I.17.    The Problem of China (1922)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1922.
                                                   ii.  New York: The Century Co., 1922.
                                                 iii.  George Allen & Unwin, 1966. 3rd impr. Foreword by BR signed “9 November, 1965”.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      I. Questions [ III.1.]
·      II. China before the Nineteenth Century
·      III. China and the Western Powers
·      IV. Modern China
·      V. Japan before the Restoration
·      VI. Modern Japan
·      VII. Japan and China before 1914
·      VIII. Japan and China before the War
·      IX. The Washington Conference
·      X. Present Forces and Tendencies in the Far East
·      XI. Chinese and Western Civilization Contrasted [III.1.]
·      XII. The Chinese Character [III.1.]
·      XIII. Higher Education in China
·      XIV. Industrialism in China
·      XV. The Outlook for China
·      Appendix
               I.18.    The ABC of Atoms (1923)
                                                     i.  London: Kegan Paul, 1923.
                                                   ii.  Contents:
·      I. Introductory
·      II. The Periodic Law
·      III. Electrons and Nuclei
·      IV. The Hydrogen Spectrum
·      V. Possible States of the Hydrogen Atom
·      VI. The Theory of Quanta
·      VII. Refinements of the Hydrogen Spectrum
·      VIII. Rings of Electrons
·      IX. X-Rays
·      X. Radio-Activity
·      XI. The Structure of Nuclei
·      XII. The New Physics and the Wave-Theory of Light
·      XIII. The New Physics and Relativity [III.4.]
·      Appendix: Bohr’s Theory of the Hydrogen Spectrum
               I.19.    The Prospects of Industrial Civilization (1923), with Dora Russell
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1923.
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1959. 2nd ed. New preface by Dora Russell.
                                                 iii.  Routledge Classics, 2010. Preface to the Second edition by Dora Russell, 1959. Preface to the First edition by Dora and Bertrand Russell, “May 10, 1923”. Introduction by Louis Greenspan, 1996.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
Part I
·      Causes of the Present Chaos [III.1.]
·      Inherent Tendencies of Industrialism [III.12.]
·      Industrialism and Private Property
·      Interactions of Industrialism and Nationalism
·      The Transition to Internationalism
·      Socialism in Undeveloped Countries
·      Socialism in Advanced Countries
Part II
·      What Makes a Social System Good or Bad? [1922, II.35.]
·      Moral Standards and Social Well-Being [III.1. & III.10.]
·      The Sources of Power
·      The Distribution of Power
·      Education
·      Economic Organization and Mental Freedom
·      Notes
               I.20.    The ABC of Relativity (1925)
                                                     i.  London: Kegan Paul, 1925.
                                                   ii.  Routledge Classics, 2009. Edited (1985) and with a Preface (2002) by Felix Pirani. Introduction by Peter Clark, 1997.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
·      1. Touch and Sight: The Earth and the Heavens [III.1.]
·      2. What Happens and What is Observed
·      3. The Velocity of Light
·      4. Clocks and Foot-rules
·      5. Space-Time
·      6. The Special Theory of Relativity
·      7. Intervals in Space-Time
·      8. Einstein's Law of Gravitation
·      9. Proofs of Einstein's Law of Gravitation
·      10. Mass, Momentum, Energy, and Action
·      11. The Expanding Universe
·      12. Conventions and Natural Laws
·      13. The Abolition of 'Force'
·      14. What is Matter?
·      15. Philosophical Consequences
               I.21.    On Education, Especially in Early Childhood (1926)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1926. Introduction by BR, 1926.
                                                   ii.  New York: Boni & Liveright, 1926, as Education and the Good Life.
                                                 iii.  New York: Philosophical Library, 1961, as Education of Character (abridged).
                                                 iv.  Routledge Classics, 2010, as On Education.
                                                   v.  Contents:
PART I: Educational Ideas
·      1. Postulates of Modern Educational Theory
·      2. The Aims of Education [III.1. & III.3.]
PART II: Education of Character
·      3. The First Year
·      4. Fear
·      5. Play and Fancy
·      6. Constructiveness
·      7. Selfishness and Property
·      8. Truthfulness
·      9. Punishment
·      10. Importance of Other Children
·      11. Affection and Sympathy
·      12. Sex Education
·      13. The Nursery School
PART III: Intellectual Education
·      14. General Principles
·      15. The School Curriculum Before Fourteen
·      16. Last School Years
·      17. Day Schools and Boarding Schools
·      18. The University
·      19. Conclusion
               I.22.    The Analysis of Matter (1927)
                                                     i.  London: Kegan Paul, 1927. Preface by BR signed “January 1927”.
                                                   ii.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1955. Introduction by Lester Denonn.
                                                 iii.  New York: Dover, 1955. Introduction by Lester Denonn.
                                                 iv.  Routledge, 1992. 1st pb ed. Introduction by John G. Slater, 1992. Reprinted, 2001.
                                                   v.  Spokesman, 2007.
                                                 vi.  Contents:
·      I. The Nature of the Problem
Part I. The Logical Analysis of Physics
·      II. Pre-Relativity Physics
·      III. Electrons and Protons
·      IV. The Theory of Quanta
·      V. The Special Theory of Relativity
·      V. The General Theory of Relativity
·      VII. The Method of Tensors
·      VIII. Geodesics
·      IX. Invariants and Their Physical Interpretation
·      X. Weyl's Theory
·      XI. The Principle of Differential Laws
·      XII. Measurement
·      XIII. Matter and Space
·      XIV. The Abstractness of Physics
Part II. Physics and Perception
·      XV. From Primitive Perception to Common Sense
·      XVI. From Common Sense to Physics
·      XVII. What is an Empirical Science?
·      XVIII. Our Knowledge of Particular Matters of Fact
·      XIX. Data, Inferences, Hypotheses, and Theories
·      XX. The Causal Theory of Perception
·      XXI. Perception and Objectivity
·      XXII. The Belief in General Laws
·      XXIII. Substance
·      XXIV. Importance of Structure in Scientific Inference
·      XXV. Perception from the Standpoint of Physics
·      XXVI. Non-Mental Analogues to Perception
Part III. The Structure of the Physical World
·      XXVII. Particulars and Events
·      XXVIII. The Construction of Points
·      XXIX. Space-Time Order
·      XXX. Causal Lines
·      XXXI. Extrinsic Causal Laws
·      XXXII. Physical and Perceptual Space-Time
·      XXXIII. Periodicity and Qualitative Series
·      XXXIV. Types of Physical Occurrences
·      XXXV. Causality and Interval
·      XXXVI. The Genesis of Space-Time
·      XXXVII. Physics and Neutral Monism [III.4.]
·      XXXVIII. Summary and Conclusion
               I.23.    An Outline of Philosophy (1927)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1927.
                                                   ii.  New York: Simon & Schuster, 1927, as Philosophy.
                                                 iii.  Routledge Classics, 2009. Introduction by John G. Slater, 1995.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      1. Philosophic Doubts
PART I: Man from Without
·      2. Man and his Environment
·      3. The Process of Learning in Animals and Infants
·      4. Language [III.4.]
·      5. Perception Objectively Regarded
·      6. Memory Objectively Regarded
·      7. Inference as a Habit
·      8. Knowledge Behaviouristically Considered [III.4.]
PART II: The Physical World
·      9. The Structure of the Atom
·      10. Relativity
·      11. Causal Laws in Physics
·      12. Physics and Perception
·      13. Physical and Perceptual Space
·      14. Perception and Physical Causal Laws
·      15. The Nature of our Knowledge of Physics
PART III: The Man from Within
·      16. Self-observation
·      17. Images
·      18. Imagination and Memory
·      19. The Introspective Analysis of Perception
·      20. Consciousness?
·      21. Emotion, Desire, and Will
·      22. Ethics
PART IV: The Universe
·      23. Some Great Philosophies of the Past
·      24. Truth and Falsehood
·      25. The Validity of Inference [III.4.]
·      26. Events, Matter, and Mind
·      27. Man’s Place in the Universe
               I.24.    Sceptical Essays (1928)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1928.
                                                   ii.  New York: W. W. Norton, 1928.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
·      Introduction: On the Value of Scepticism [1928, II.47.]
·      Dreams and Facts [1919, IV.19.]
·      Is Science Superstitious? [1926, II.54.]
·      Can Men be Rational? [1923, II.36.]
·      Philosophy in the Twentieth Century [1924, III.4. & IV.9.]
·      Machines and the Emotions [1924]
·      Behaviourism and Values [1926, IV.9.]
·      Eastern and Western Ideals of Happiness [1924, II.40.]
·      The Harm that Good Men Do [1926]
·      The Recrudescence of Puritanism [1923]
·      The Need for Political Scepticism [1924, IV.16.]
·      Free Thought and Official Propaganda [1926, II.34.]
·      Freedom in Society [1926, IV.17.]
·      Freedom Versus Authority in Education [1924, IV.16.]
·      Psychology and Politics [1924, IV.9. or 1926, IV.16.?]
·      The Danger of Creed Wars [1924, IV.17.]
·      Some Prospects: Cheerful and Otherwise
               I.25.    Marriage and Morals (1929)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1929.
                                                   ii.  New York: Liveright, 1929. Alternative titles of the first three chapters!
                                                 iii.  Routledge Classics, 2009.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      1. Introduction (US: Why a Sexual Ethic is Necessary) [III.10.]
·      2. Matrilineal Societies (US: Where Fatherhood is Unknown)
·      3. Patriarchal Systems (US: The Dominion of the Father)
·      4. Phallic Worship, Asceticism and Sin
·      5. Christian Ethics
·      6. Romantic Love
·      7. The Liberation of Women
·      8. The Taboo on Sex Knowledge
·      9. The Place of Love in Human Life
·      10. Marriage
·      11. Prostitution
·      12. Trial Marriage
·      13. The Family at the Present Day
·      14. The Family in Individual Psychology
·      15. The Family and the State
·      16. Divorce
·      17. Population
·      18. Eugenics
·      19. Sex and Individual Well-Being
·      20. The Place of Sex among Human Values [III.4. & III.10.]
·      21. Conclusion [III.10., as “Marriage and Morals”]
               I.26.    The Conquest of Happiness (1930)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1930. Preface by BR.
                                                   ii.  Routledge Classics, 2006. Preface by A. C. Grayling.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
I. Causes of Unhappiness
·      1. What Makes People Unhappy? [III.12.]
·      2. Byronic Unhappiness
·      3. Competition
·      4. Boredom and Excitement
·      5. Fatigue
·      6. Envy
·      7. The Sense of Sin [III.12.]
·      8. Persecution Mania
·      9. Fear of Public Opinion
II. Causes of Happiness
·      10. Is Happiness Still Possible?
·      11. Zest
·      12. Affection
·      13. The Family
·      14. Work
·      15. Impersonal Interests
·      16. Effort and Resignation
·      17. The Happy Man
               I.27.    The Scientific Outlook (1931)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1931.
                                                   ii.  New York: W. W. Norton, 1931.
                                                 iii.  Contents:
·      Introduction
·      01. Examples of Scientific Method
·      02. Characteristics of Scientific Method
·      03. Limitations of Scientific Method [III.4.]
·      04. Scientific Metaphysics
·      05. Science and Religion [III.9.]
·      06. Beginnings of Scientific Technique
·      07. Technique in Inanimate Nature
·      08. Technique in Biology
·      09. Technique in Physiology
·      10. Technique in Psychology
·      11. Technique in Society
·      12. Artificially Created Societies
·      13. The Individual and the Whole
·      14. Scientific Government
·      15. Education in a Scientific Society
·      16. Scientific Reproduction
·      17. Science and Values
               I.28.    Education and the Social Order (1932)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1932.
                                                   ii.  New York: W. W. Norton, 1932, as Education and the Modern World.
                                                 iii.  Routledge Classics, 2010.
                                                 iv.  Contents:
·      01. The Individual versus the Citizen
·      02. The Negative Theory of Education
·      03. Education and Heredity
·      04. Emotion and Discipline
·      05. Home versus School
·      06. Aristocrats, Democrats and Bureaucrats
·      07. The Herd in Education
·      08. Religion in Education
·      09. Sex in Education
·      10. Patriotism in Education
·      11. Class-feeling in Education
·      12. Competition in Education
·      13. Education under Communism
·      14. Education and Economics
·      15. Propaganda in Education
·      16. The Reconciliation of Individuality and Citizenship [III.4.]
               I.29.    Freedom and Organization: 1814-1914 (1934)
                                                     i.  London: George Allen & Unwin, 1934. Preface by BR signed “May 1934”.
                                                   ii.  New York: W. W. Norton, 1934, as Freedom versus Organization.
                                                 iii.  London: Unwin Books, 1965. 2 vols. Vol. 1: Legitimacy versus Industrialism 1814-1848. Vol. 2: Freedom versus Organization, 1776-1914.
                                                 iv.  Routledge Classics, 2010.
                                                   v.  Contents:
PART I: The Principle of Legitimacy
·      1. Napoleon’s Successors
·      2. The Congress of Vienna
·      3. The Holy Alliance
·      4. The Twilight of Metternich
PART II: The March of Mind
Section A: The Social Background
·      5. The Aristocracy
·      6. Country Life
·      7. Industrial Life
Section B: The Philosophical Radicals
·      8. Malthus
·      9. Bentham
·      10. James Mill
·      11. Ricardo
·      12. The Benthamite Doctrine
·      13. Democracy in England
·      14. Free Trade
Section C: Socialism
·      15. Owen and Early British Socialism
·      16. Early Trade Unionism
·      17. Marx and Engels
·      18. Dialectical Materialism [III.4.]
·      19. The Theory of Surplus Value [III.4.]
·      20. The Politics of Marxism
PART III: Democracy and Plutocracy in America
Section A: Democracy in America
·      21. Jeffersonian Democracy
·      22. The Settlement of the West
·      23. Jacksonian Democracy
·      24. Slavery and Disunion
·      25. Lincoln and National Unity
Section B: Competition and Monopoly in America
·      26. Competitive Capitalism
·      27. The Approach to Monopoly
PART IV: Nationalism and Imperialism
·      28. The Principle of Nationality
·      29. Bismarck and German Unity
·      30. The Economic Development of the German Empire
·      31. Imperialism
·      32. The Arbiters of Europe
·      Conclusion
·      Notes
·      Bibliography

Section I.30-63.

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